Loading…
Hawaii Behavioral Health and Wellness Convention has ended
Need to register?  Click HERE.
Back To Schedule
Friday, October 22 • 2:45pm - 4:15pm
A Journey to Health Equity through Community-Building in Papakōlea

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule, view media, leave feedback and see who's attending!

Description of the Program:
Traditionally, Native Hawaiians were a vibrant and robust population. Due to the consequences of colonization, Native Hawaiians are now disproportionately impacted by chronic diseases, such as dementia, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases when compared to the other major ethnic groups in Hawaiʻi. The following presentations highlight studies that helped one Native Hawaiian homestead community successfully pursue its long-term community goal of empowering its kūpuna (elders) and their families to achieve health equity. The model implemented by Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi in the Native Hawaiian homestead communities of Papakōlea is one that was grounded in community-based participatory research (CBPR) and guided by data and community priorities. This model can be helpful to other marginalized communities in Hawai‘i and the world.
Learning Objectives:
After attending this session, an attendee will be able to:
Discuss various social, emotional, environmental, and health-related barriers to achieving health equity for Native Hawaiians in one homestead community
Identify challenges encountered by caregivers and kūpuna who desire to safely “age in place” within their own communities
Describe one innovative, successful, sustainable community-based public health program created to address the needs of aging kūpuna and their families

Overall Abstract:
“A Journey to Health Equity through Community-Building and Collaboration in the Midst of COVID-19 in One Native Hawaiian Homestead Community”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Due to the consequences of colonization, Native Hawaiians are disproportionately impacted by chronic diseases. Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalawahine are neighboring homesteads, jointly referred to as Papakōlea, and these homestead lands are located in lower socioeconomic areas traditionally associated with poor health outcomes. Kula no na Po'e Hawai'i (KULA) is a 501(c)3 community-based non-profit organization established in 1992 to provide families of the Papakōlea Hawaiian Homestead region with access to culturally relevant services and programs from a social determinant of health perspective.
Methods: KULA’s social determinants of health approach recognizes the cultural, educational, and environmental conditions that impact overall well-being while seeking health equity. KULA’s community and research initiatives are grounded in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach.
Results: Community-based research efforts have led to the successful creation and implementation of social development programs in Papakōlea, such as the Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN). Due to the existence of a robust community infrastructure established through CBPR efforts, Papakōlea has been able to respond quickly and methodically to the needs of its community. Through ongoing community-engaged efforts such as food distribution and vaccination drives, the families of Papakōlea have remained safe, healthy, well-nourished, and at the forefront of a strong and resilient community.
Conclusions and Implications: The following presentations highlight studies that helped Papakōlea successfully pursue its long-term community goal of empowering families to achieve health equity. The model implemented is one that was grounded in CBPR, guided by data and community priorities, and helped address the needs of families and their kūpuna (elders).

Abstract #1: Building community resilience through infrastructure and data:
“Kawaihonaakealoha Kūpuna Service Project”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Papakōlea is a densely populated community with a significant aging population. Kawaihonaakealoha was a community-based research effort to identify the health and safety needs of the community’s kūpuna and implement a community support system that would empower residents to safely ‘age in place.’
 
Methods: Qualified residents completed a 2-part survey over 6 months which included a community-designed Home Environmental Scan and a community-tailored version of the Elder Survey.
Results: 240 surveys (33%) were completed. The top five chronic diseases were: high blood pressure (58%), arthritis (31%), diabetes (26%), cataracts (17%), and asthma (15%). Other needs included: addressing home safety and repairs; functional limitations; instrumental activities of daily living; dietary concerns; long-term care; and housing.
Conclusions: A community-led intervention was implemented which included: (1) coordinating direct assistance to elders; (2) development of a culturally-sensitive, community lead case-management system; and (3) the creation of a service-learning program for Public Health and Social Work practicum students.

Abstract #2: Creating a Community Response to Health Equity through CBPR:
“Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN)”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand the social, environmental, and health-related needs impacting families in Papakōlea.
Methods: The Hawaiian Homestead Health Survey (HHS) was mailed to 390 of 422 homes in Papakōlea. Categories included: social demographics, physical activity, dietary behaviors, mental health, cultural and ethnic identity, and health related factors.
Results: The top five chronic diseases were hypertension (54%), high cholesterol (41%), asthma (26%), diabetes (23%) and arthritis (17%). Respondents had an average BMI of 31, indicating 29% were overweight and 51% were obese. Most have lived in the homestead for 10 or more years (94%), and there is a large population of retirees (37%) and widows (11%).
Conclusions: Using these data, the Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN) was developed. It provides kūpuna and their caregivers with educational resources, cultural programming, and training, making health and wellness a priority, and creating demonstrable improvements in health, functional status, and quality of life.

Abstract #3: Providing Community Recovery to the COVID-19 Pandemic through CBPR:
“Kūpuna Community Care Network 2 (KCCN2)”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Data was collected to inform community-based programs that address health equity through empowering kūpuna of Papakōlea to safely “age in place”.
Methods: Three surveys were conducted: (1) Identifying Our Needs: A Survey of Elders VII; (2) Home Environmental Scan; and (3) Papakōlea Caregiver Survey.
Results: 30% of residents are kūpuna, 93% live in intergenerational homes (37% with 6+ people), and 17% live below the poverty line. A third (33%) provide care for grandchildren, more than a third are caregivers of a kūpuna themselves, and 75% foresee needing a caregiver in the future. The condition of homes and environmental challenges interfere with ‘aging in place’ safely.
Conclusions: The goals of the Kūpuna Community Care Network 2 (KCCN 2) are: 1) to increase the use of technology to address social isolation during the pandemic, 2) provide education and training with a specific focus on pandemic response and dementia, and 3) increase home and community safety

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Adrienne Dillard, PhD

Adrienne Dillard, PhD

Executive Director, Kula No Nā Po‘e Hawai‘i
Dr. Adrienne Dillard is the Executive Director of Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi (KULA), a community-based 501c non-profit formed in 1992 with a specific focus on providing culturally-grounded programs and services in the Hawaiian Homestead communities of Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalāwahine... Read More →
avatar for B. Puni Kekauoha

B. Puni Kekauoha

Associate Director, Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi
Ms. B. Puni Kekauoha is the Associate Director of Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi (KULA), a community-based 501c non-profit formed in 1992 with a specific focus on providing culturally-grounded programs and services in the Hawaiian Homestead communities of Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalāwahine... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Native Hawaiian Health, JABSOM
Dr. Andrea Hermosura is a Native Hawaiian Assistant Professor at the Department of Native Hawaiian Health and a licensed clinical psychologist at the Queen’s Medical Center and the Physician Center Mililani.
avatar for Sarah Momilani Marshall, PhD

Sarah Momilani Marshall, PhD

Native Hawaiian Postdoctoral Researcher, Hawai'i Pacific University
Dr. Sarah Momilani Marshall is a Native Hawaiian postdoctoral researcher at Hawai‘i Pacific University, focusing on health disparities that persist among rural Hawaiian populations. She is the principal investigator on a National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) diversity supplement... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 4
  Symposium