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Thursday, October 21
 

8:00am HST

Interconnectedness Plenary Session with Introductory Remarks from Hawai'i Lieutenant Governor Josh Green
The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Green, MD

Josh Green, MD

LT Governor, Hawaii State Government
Josh Green is a local physician, husband, and father of two who has dedicated his life to caring for Hawaii families.Dr. Green was born in Kingston, New York, and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received his bachelor’s degree from Swarthmore College and completed his medical... Read More →
avatar for U'ilani Lin Hoon Kiaha, MSW

U'ilani Lin Hoon Kiaha, MSW

Moloka'i Representative, National Association of Social Workers - Hawai'i Chapter
'O Desiree “U'ilani” Lin Hoon Kiaha ko'u inoa. 'O Louis Kauhane Wallace a me Diana Mililani (Naihe) Wallace ko'u mau mākua. 'O au ka lua o 'eono keiki. 'O ke Iesu ku'u haku maika'i, a nāna no i pomaika'i ia'u e 'imi i nā 'ike o kelā 'ano keia 'ano. 'O ka home ko'u kula mua... Read More →
avatar for Gay Barfield, PhD, LMFT

Gay Barfield, PhD, LMFT

Dr. Leah (Swenson) Barfield, holds a BA as a graduate of University of California at Berkeley, Masters level teaching credential from San Francisco State University, advanced studies at the Sorbonne in France, and a Ph.D. from Union Graduate School, and is a Hawaii Licensed Marriage... Read More →
avatar for John Souza, Jr., LMFT, DMFT

John Souza, Jr., LMFT, DMFT

President, Hawaiian Islands Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
Dr. John Souza, Jr. is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) and Clinical Fellow and Approved Supervisor with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Dr. John specializes in working with young adults and their families.Born on O’ahu and raised... Read More →
avatar for Yvonne Yim, MSW, LCSW, PhD

Yvonne Yim, MSW, LCSW, PhD

President-Elect, National Association of Social Workers - Hawai'i Chapter
Yvonne Duhaylongsod Yim hails from Pearl City, Oahu and earned a PhD in Organizational Development and Leadership. She is a licensed clinical social worker, licensed nursing home administrator, and practical nurse. She has worked passionately in acute and long term care facilities... Read More →
avatar for Nozanin Yusufbekova, PsyD

Nozanin Yusufbekova, PsyD

President, Hawai'i Psychological Association


Thursday October 21, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 1
  Roundtable Session

9:00am HST

How to Lead Without a Title
We're taught to think of leadership as something that's given to us. If someone in authority hires us into a formal leadership role, then we're allowed to lead - otherwise, we're supposed to follow.

But real leaders don't wait for an invitation. Anyone can lead, from anywhere they are. All it takes is a cause worth pursuing, an idea worth sharing, or a vision worth bringing to life. In our talk, we'll show you how. We'll guide the audience to challenge their misconceptions about leadership and develop practical ways for anybody to become a leader, regardless of title. As we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic, we have an opportunity to not just return to normal life, but create a new vision for what life together could be. That new vision will take new leaders - and our talk will help inspire them to step forward.
  • Learn strategies for self-leadership and taking initiative
  • Discover ways to lead without resorting to control tactics
  • Recognize how to make an impact and lead through non-traditional routes

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.



Speakers
avatar for Kyler Shumway, PsyD

Kyler Shumway, PsyD

Chief Executive Officer, Deep Eddy Psychotherapy
Kyler is a bestselling author, psychologist, and CEO of one of the largest psychotherapy practices in Texas. He has been featured by Forbes, The New York Times, CNN, and more for his work in combatting the loneliness epidemic. His mission is to help people learn to love themselves... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Wendler, PsyD

Daniel Wendler, PsyD

Postdoctoral Fellow, Deep Eddy Psychotherapy
Dan is a two-time TEDx speaker, psychologist, and best-selling author. He's been featured by Bloomberg Businessweek, the American Psychological Association, and more for his work in helping behavioral health professionals find career success and grow their professional impact. He... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 2
  Keynote Workshop

9:00am HST

Same Boat, Different Paddles? Harm Reduction Therapy as an Integrated Model
Each mental health profession has its own “provider culture”- a world view, a way of seeing people and the process of change, and beliefs about what is important for us to learn.

Harm Reduction Psychotherapy (HRP) was developed by a psychologist and a social worker, both with child and family experience. HRP has been further developed by other psychologists and social workers, by family therapists, drug and alcohol counselors, case managers, psychiatrists and nurse practitioners, and by the clients that we serve.

It is exactly our awareness of such intersectionality that has allowed the creation of a treatment model that can work with individuals, families, and systems; one that is inherently an integration of mental health and substance misuse treatment; one that recognizes the social context and constructs that are so often ignored; one that acknowledges the importance of biological factors in suffering and in healing; and one that places our clients’ perspective, wishes, and needs as central to our work.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to identify 2 basic principles of Harm Reduction Psychotherapy (HRP)
Participants will be able to list 2 clinical components of HRP
Participants will appreciate the different contributions made by different mental health professions

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jeannie Little, LCSW

Jeannie Little, LCSW

Executive Director, Harm Reduction Therapy Center
Jeannie Little is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Group Psychotherapist. She is the Executive Director of the Harm Reduction Therapy Center, a non-profit agency providing harm reduction treatment for drug and alcohol users with other emotional problems. Since 1990... Read More →
avatar for Patt Denning

Patt Denning

Director of Clinical Services & Training, Harm Reduction Therapy Center
Dr. Patt Denning is one of the primary developers of Harm Reduction treatments for alcohol and other drug problems. She is co-founder and Director of Clinical Services and Training of the Harm Reduction Therapy Center (founded in 2000). Since 1978, Dr. Denning has worked as a clinician... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 3
  Keynote Workshop

9:00am HST

Beyond Right and Wrong: Stories of Justice and Forgiveness
In this session, participants will gain deep insight into the struggle for justice, forgiveness, healing, rebuilding and reconciliation by watching a documentary film on prevention techniques to avoid the cycle of genocide in three countries and that helps to explain trauma, crime, recovery, interpersonal and international peace mediation techniques, all of which are useful to every individual. Participants will also examine and learn how the cycle of violence can be broken using restitutional justice. Time permitting, the group will analyze and discuss restitutional justice and actions that heal with fairness using mercy to self and others.

Learning Objectives:
At the end of this program, participants will be able to:
  • Describe “Restorative” or “Restitutional” justice through negotiation techniques.
  • Explain ways to use these negotiation techniques to heal trauma and prevent future pain (including genocide).
  • Explain how peaceful words and actions, if consciously chosen, can prevent humans from destroying one another.
  • Assess how Intergenerational genocide is preventable.
  • Discuss how the best way to fight may be to make a peaceful agreement.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Laurette DeMandel-Schaller, LMFT, Ph.D.

Laurette DeMandel-Schaller, LMFT, Ph.D.

Owner, President, Dr. Schaller Incorporated-A Psychological Inc.
Laurette DeMandel-Schaller, MFT, Ph.D, lnc, has been in private practice for 36 years, providing Psychological and Family Court Services in Hawaii, and the mainland. Dr. Schaller is a Court Appointed Child Custody Evaluator, Guardian ad Litem, and Senior Mediator. She has been on... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 6
  Workshop

9:00am HST

Indigenous Community Psychologies: Co-creating Pathways towards Decoloniality
Psychological knowledge with scientific ambitions has primarily emerged in the Western World. Systems of scientific knowledge built in the Western hemisphere erased Indigenous knowledge through the colonization and imperialistic exploitation of lands and peoples. Evidences of the devastating pervasive impacts of these Western colonial systems are epistemicide and genocide of many Indigenous cultures. However, Indigenous cultures are still thriving, resisting, surviving, and contesting colonial impositions in knowledge and action. Indigenous movements have sprouted everywhere. One of them is Indigenous psychologies that are proposing emic versus etic research, decolonial ontologies, epistemologies, axiologies, and methodologies to co-construct knowledge and praxes “otherwise.” These movements are furnishing the making of Indigenous community psychologies that address the plurality of perspectives and voices representing psychological phenomena in diverse geopolitical settings. We begin a new era of decoloniality by stopping the erasure of contributions from the Global South that are not anthropocentric and whose common theme is the sacredness of nature, the cultivation of spirituality, and accountability to maintain harmonious relationships with humans and other-than-humans. Indigenous community psychologies were applied in affective conviviality with inter-generational communities in diverse regions of Mexico. Solidary collaborations with Indigenous communities promote sumac kawsay(wellbeing) and the pluriversal co-construction of the Zapatista’s world in which many worlds are possible.

In this presentation we will learn about some examples of Indigenous Psychologies from the Global South (the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands). We will review their constructs, principles, values, theories and praxes and determine common threats and differences. We will learn the main assumptions of community psychologies in the Global South and some examples of applications in praxes to propose Indigenous community psychologies that co-construct pathways towards decoloniality for epistemic, ecological, and cultural justice.

Learning Objectives:
  • Comprehend that there are diverse psychologies informed by their own cultural contexts, cosmovisions, ontologies, epistemologies, and axiologies
  • Learn about tools and approaches developed in the fields of Indigenous and community psychology
  • Discern the interplay of inter-subjectivity, cultural phenomena, and decoloniality
  • Be exposed to applications of Indigenous community psychologies in Mexico

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Nuria Ciofalo

Nuria Ciofalo

Core Faculty, Pacifica Graduate Institute
Nuria Ciofalo is Core Professor and Co-Founder of the Community, Liberation, Indigenous, and Eco- Psychologies specialization at Pacifica Graduate Institute. Born in Mexico, she gained her B.A. and first M.A. in Clinical and Social Psychology at the University of Munich, Germany where... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 5
  Workshop

9:00am HST

An Introduction To Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT) For Disorders Of Over-Control
Note: This presentation requires a passcode to enter the room.  The passcode is: 12345.

Aims: This 3 hour live webinar gives mental health practitioners (e.g. psychology, psychiatry, social work, mental health nursing) who are not yet familiar with RO DBT and overview of what type of treatment RO DBT is. The aim is for clinicians to be able to make a more informed decision after attending this webinar on whether or not RO DBT is suitable for their clients and whether they want to learn how to practice RO DBT.

Content Level: this live webinar is at the introductory/beginner level: no previous knowledge of RO DBT is required.

Target Audience: Apart from a professional qualification in a mental health or related field (e.g. psychology, psychiatry, social work, mental health nursing) there are no further prerequisites for the course. Previous training in standard DBT is not a requirement.

Brief summary of RO DBT: Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO DBT) is a treatment for patients who suffer from emotional and behavioral over-control. Some clients lack emotional control and need interventions designed to enhance emotional and behavioral control; others, for whom RO DBT is designed, require interventions designed to relax rigid or inflexible control. RO DBT has been researched over the past 25 years for patients with chronic depression, chronic anxiety or anorexia nervosa. Research results suggest that it is effective in these, and other, hard-to-treat groups such as Autism Spectrum Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder.

Learning Objectives. After attending this webinar, you will be able to:
1.    Define the problem of overcontrol according to the four core deficits and the biosocial theory for overcontrol
2.    Describe what Radical Openness is (and is not)
3.    Describe the RO-DBT treatment hierarchy and modes of treatment
4.    Evaluate whether RO DBT might be a suitable treatment for your clients
5.    Understand what a social signal is and how they are important in RO DBT
6. Recognize the unique therapist stance in RO DBT

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Hope Arnold

Hope Arnold

Founder, RO DBT Denver
Hope Arnold, LCSW, MA is a Supervisor and Trainer in Radically Open DBT (RO DBT). She began her RO DBT training with Dr. Tom Lynch, treatment developer, in 2016. Hope continues to attend intensive trainings throughout the country and receives regular supervision from Dr. Lynch. Hope... Read More →
avatar for Lori Prado

Lori Prado

Founder, President & Senior Clinician, Center for Dialectical and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Lori Prado, LMHC, LPC-S, CEDS, is a Senior Clinician and one day Trainer in Radically Open DBT (RO DBT). She began her training with Dr. Tom Lynch, developer of RO DBT, in 2015. Since that time, Lori has continued to attend intensive trainings and receive supervision from Dr. Tom... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 12:15pm HST
Room 8
  Keynote Workshop

9:00am HST

Roles for Psychologists and Social Workers in Medical-Aid-in-Dying
Hawaii’s Our Care Our Choice Act (OCOCA), which went into effect in January 2019, allows terminally ill, mentally competent, adult residents of the state to request medical aid in dying (MAID) to relieve unbearable suffering at the end of life. Licensed psychiatrists, psychologists and clinical social workers are authorized to conduct mental health consultations for MAID patients. Our presentation will begin with a brief review of the history and content of the law, focusing particularly on Hawaii’s unique mental health provisions. Dr. Goodyear will then discuss essential components of the mental health consultation and important elements of the reporting process. Case examples will be presented to illustrate the types of clinical issues that may be encountered in the evaluation of MAID patients. We will consider the question of whether a mandatory mental health evaluation is necessary for all MAID patients. Dr. Spira will present further insights about the evaluation process and additional case examples. Dr. Spira will also discuss existential issues that may arise in the continuum of end-of-life care. Jodi Shaw will then address the roles that social workers may play as patient navigators, members of the medical treatment team, and other roles that help to support patients and families in the MAID process and end-of-life care. Finally, Samantha Trad will present data to illustrate both national trends in MAID and utilization of OCOCA in Hawaii. Proposed improvements to OCOCA designed to better facilitate patient access will be addressed.
Objectives
Attendees will be able to:
  • Describe the provisions of Hawaii’s Our Care Our Choice Act.
  • Describe the essential components of the mental health consultation.
  • Describe the various roles that psychologists and social workers may play in the medical aid in dying process.
  • Describe national trends in medical aid in dying and proposed changes to the Our Care, Our Choice Act.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for James Spira, PhD, MPH, ABPP

James Spira, PhD, MPH, ABPP

Director, Pacific Behavioral Health
Dr. Spira is a Licensed Psychologist (HI, CA), in private practice (Pacific Behavioral Health), and 2017 President of the Hawaii Psychological Association. He obtained his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley with a specialty in Health Psychology, and completed postdoctoral... Read More →
avatar for Brian Goodyear

Brian Goodyear

Licensed Psychologist, Private Practice
Brian Goodyear, Ph.D.: Licensed Psychologist.  Dr. Goodyear completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Rehabilitation Hospital of the Pacific.  He has maintained a private practice on Oahu for almost 30... Read More →
avatar for Samantha Trad, M.A.

Samantha Trad, M.A.

Senior Campaign Director, Hawaii & California for Compassion and Choices
Samantha Trad M.A.: Senior Campaign Director for Hawaii and California for Compassion and Choices. Samantha passionately works hard to expand patient-centered and patient-directed end-of-life care across the state. She is an expert on implementing medical aid in dying laws and leads... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Anne Shaw

Jodi Anne Shaw

Patient Care Coordinator, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii
Jodi Shaw, LSW, CCM, OSW-C, APHSW-C: Licensed Social Worker. Jodi Shaw is the oncology social worker for Kaiser Permanente Hawaii and one of two Patient Care Coordinators for the Medical Aid in Dying option. Jodi received her BA in Asian American Studies at the University of Washington... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 9:00am - 12:15pm HST
Room 4
  Workshop

10:30am HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345 

Thursday October 21, 2021 10:30am - 10:45am HST
Room 7 - Break Room

10:45am HST

How to Help Survivors and Enactors of Bullying
When we think about bullying, we imagine kids being mean on the playground. And yet no matter what age your clients may be, chances are bullying has played a part in their story.

To make matters worse, bullying has evolved over the years. The bullies we grew up with are different from the ones we see today. Plus, the old ways of dealing with bullying don't work the way they used to. In fact, many of our strategies for dealing with bullies tend to make the problem worse.

But it doesn't have to be that way.

Drawing on his personal experiences of bullying as well as up-to-date research and clinical insights, Dr. Kyler Shumway explains why it exists, how it particularly affects our clients, and what all of us - whether students, professionals, or parents - can do to create a world without bullying.
  • Understand modern bullying on a deeper level
  • Learn strategies for helping survivors of bullying
  • Recognize how effective interventions can create lasting change

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Kyler Shumway, PsyD

Kyler Shumway, PsyD

Chief Executive Officer, Deep Eddy Psychotherapy
Kyler is a bestselling author, psychologist, and CEO of one of the largest psychotherapy practices in Texas. He has been featured by Forbes, The New York Times, CNN, and more for his work in combatting the loneliness epidemic. His mission is to help people learn to love themselves... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 2
  Keynote Workshop

10:45am HST

Finding Your Superhero: The Transformative Use of Metaphor in Therapy
While there is a lack of consensus regarding how metaphors affect change (Boyle, 1954, as cited in May, 1991), there is growing acknowledgment across multiple theoretical orientations that metaphors have transformative power (Ferrari, 2000). Metaphors activate a natural process of meaning making. They use a client’s own inner resources (Clarke, 2014) and cultural idioms (Kovecses, 2010) to create a unique portrait of the client’s understanding of the deeper meanings of their experiences. They also provide a means of dialectically processing the connections between the conscious and unconscious, digital and analogical, literal and existential. In doing so, metaphors help us reach beyond our boundaries to discover more of who we are (Kaur & Eqbal, 2015). The night sea journey archetype, more popularly known as the hero's journey archetype, is probably one of the most common metaphors that emerge in the process of therapy. On the hero's journey, each individual is challenged by ambivalence, self-doubt, and despair, yet finds hope, redemption, and empowerment. It captures the individual’s journey of self-discovery and provides a means of helping the individual overcome adversity through the discovery of a personal narrative of a hero within. This workshop will provide you with ways to incorporate metaphors into your daily practice. The workshop will provide you with emerging data on how metaphors are used through examples and practice. Be prepared to find your own inner superhero.

Learning Objectives for the Program:
Participants will be able to:
1) explain how metaphors are an active, dialectical process.
2) identify at least three mechanisms of change associated with metaphoric process.
3) identify a procedure for exploring and utilizing one’s own sense of the hero within.
4) list the stages of the Hero’s Journey.
5) incorporate ways to introduce superheroes into their practice.
6) introduce superheroes through progressive muscle relaxation and deep breathing exercise.

Joy Tanji, PhD: A brief overview of metaphors and how we think they work
There is growing interest in the use of metaphors across theoretical orientations, but there remains limited theory and research on how it effects transformation and healing. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to a dialectical model of metaphors and their mechanisms of change that may be used to guide future research on the use of metaphoric process in therapy.

Robert Yoshimura, PsyD: The significance of the hero’s journey archetype
The hero’s journey archetype is a pancultural theme reflected in people’s search for self knowledge. It's been associated with a pattern of iterative phases that depict a predictable sequence of mini transformations a person goes through on their journey towards self discovery. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to the Hero’s Journey archetype as a guide for assessing where a client is in the process of change.

Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS: Finding your superhero
Superheroes are more than entertainment. They can help tell your story, help you with coping strategies, and help your client connect with you. In this presentation, participants will be introduced to ways to incorporate superheroes into their practice, from mindful activities to allowing the person to help share their experiences. Participants will engage in different superhero progressive muscle relaxation they can do with people of all ages and abilities.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP has two Master's degrees; one in Community Clinical Psychology, the other in Marriage and Family Therapy. She is currently working towards her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Hawai’i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University... Read More →
avatar for Joy M. Tanji, PhD

Joy M. Tanji, PhD

Associate Professor, Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Joy Tanji, PhD is an associate professor with the Hawai‘i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu. She grew up in upcountry Maui, the grandchild of tenant farmers and plantation workers. She began her journey as a stone lithographer before pursuing... Read More →
avatar for Robert L.K. Yoshimura, PsyD

Robert L.K. Yoshimura, PsyD

Primary Care Mental Health Integration (PCMHI) psychologist, San Francisco VA
Robert Yoshimura, PsyD is a Primary Care Mental Health Integration (PCMHI) psychologist with the VISN 21 Clinical Resource Hub at the San Francisco VA. He joined the VISIN 21 CRH Hub through the realignment with VA Pacific Island Health Care System (VAPIHCS) Telehub services in August... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 3
  Workshop

10:45am HST

Kūkulu Kumuhana Wellbeing: Grounding in Ancestral Abundance, Strength in Connection
The Coronavirus pandemic has had a worldwide impact on the health and wellbeing of people. In Hawaiʻi, our ‘ohana and communities continue to be confronted with uncertainty, loss and constant change. Through these ongoing stresses and challenges, it is paramount to remain connected to each other, systems of support and the practices that uplift our health and wellbeing. This workshop will explore traditional Hawaiian culture and values through Kūkulu Kumuhana. This wellbeing tool was developed through collaboration of Liliʻuokalani Trust, Kamehameha Schools, Office of Hawaiian Affairs and others which uplifts six principles of Ea (self-determination), ʻĀina Momona (healthy and productive land and people), Pilina (mutually sustaining relationships), Waiwai (ancestral knowledge and collective wealth), ʻŌiwi (cultural identity and native intelligence) and Ke Akua Mana (spirituality and sacredness of mana). The Native Hawaiian Wellbeing During COVID-19 resource was developed to provide practical ideas and activities as a tool to strengthen ʻohana during this unsettling time. It was featured in OHA’s Ka Wai Ola magazine as a strategy for thriving in a pandemic. The Kūkulu Kumuhana Keiki Activity was later developed as a way to spark intentional family dialogue and youth empowerment. Join us for this workshop to learn about Kūkulu Kumuhana, the tools developed in response to COVID-19 and explore ways that it can be used in your work, communities and ʻohana. These tools recognize and uplift the foundation of abundance that our kūpuna laid and center these values and practices amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Through culture and values, we remain interconnected to each other, kūpuna and ʻāina to uplift our ola!

Learning Objectives: After this presentation, participants will:
• Become acquainted with the Kūkulu Kumuhana wellbeing framework.
• Be able to articlate the six dimensions of Kūkulu Kumuhana.
• Leave with practical ideas for implementing Kūkulu Kumuhama in your work, communities and ʻohana.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW

Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW

Program Coordinator, Ceeds of Peace
Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW (she/her) was born and raised in Hilo on Hawaiʻi Island and identifies as wahine Hawaiʻi, mother, wife, daughter, aunty, hula learner, ʻāina aloha and social justice worker. She is a trauma informed care trainer, social justice consultant and project manager... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 5
  Workshop

10:45am HST

We Are All One
This workshop is designed for those familiar with the state of interconnectedness and those who are beginning to understand of nature of “Oneness.”  Participants do not have to be of any spiritual, religious, or theoretical perspective to appreciate how “We Are All One” joins us collectively.  Our approach provides fundamental principles that underly personal development and transformation and is applicable to the therapeutic experience.  Our workshop will provide both theoretical and practical approaches to core, intrinsic experiences of single unity and integration.

As humans we have a compelling urge to discover and become aware of our true nature, which is innate, and lies at the core of our being.  This truth connects us all. We acknowledge that every culture has different traditions, attitudes, and values, yet underneath the quest we are all the same. We seek to awaken this sense of oneness through connection where we experience universal happiness and love. A central problem arises in that we have become conditioned by our fears and anxieties to believe that unifying consciousness risks the loss of our own self-identity. This is a myth. This self we are protecting is a mere image, which we have created to separate our known self from our unknown self. The belief has fostered the dualistic split that we are either all one or we are all separate.

What are the characteristics of this experience of interconnectedness? How can we achieve such a state of oneness in our daily lives? How might we become free of the self-design we have formed so that we might understand the whole of who we are? How do we achieve a deeper self-awareness and become more sensitive to ourselves, others and the interconnectedness between us?

All life is spiritual, so all are problems are spiritually based. In this presentation we aim to challenge ourselves to integrate the spiritual with the psychological in therapy. We will do this through didactic and experiential exercises.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for S. Joy Quick

S. Joy Quick

Board of Directors, Hawaiian Islands Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
Joy Quick, MA, LMFT, CSAC, held the positions of Director of Training and Program Director of the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program at Argosy University, Hawai`i, for 10 years. Ms. Quick earned her Master’s degree from East Carolina University in 1975. In addition, she completed... Read More →
avatar for James Siebert, PhD

James Siebert, PhD

Program Director, Addiction Counseling Programs, Beal University
Dr. Siebert earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and held the positions of Chair of the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) and Counseling Psychology (Ed.D.) programs at Argosy University, Hawai`i. He has worked in the areas of mental health, culture-based substance abuse treatment... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Pressel

Glenn Pressel

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Private Practice
Glenn Pressel, MA, LMFT is a Hawaii Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (MFT174). He received his Master’s Degree at Antioch University in Seattle WA. Glenn has over 40 years in the therapist’s chair. He has worked extensively with attachment, and intimacy and relationship... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 6
  Workshop

12:15pm HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345

Thursday October 21, 2021 12:15pm - 1:00pm HST
Room 7 - Break Room

1:00pm HST

How to Give a TEDx Talk as a Behavioral Health Professional
With the right idea, fifteen minutes is all you need to change the world.

That's the vision behind TED talks. Find an idea worth spreading, distill it down into a compelling fifteen minute speech - and you have a TED talk.

Of course, only a few people each year are invited to the main TED conference. But the TED organization allows local groups to organize their own TED conferences, called "TEDx events." Speakers at TEDx events have the opportunity to reach a large local audience, and have their talk published online to impact a worldwide audience.

As a behavioral health professional, your wellspring of mental health insight and knowledge gives you a unique opportunity to give an incredible TEDx talk. By taking the TEDx stage, you might inspire your audience, share important psychological truths and supercharge your own career.

And in this presentation, you'll learn how to make it happen. Taught by Dr. Daniel Wendler, a two-time TEDx speaker whose TEDx talks have been viewed by over half a million people online, you'll learn strategies for getting invited to a TEDx stage, figuring out your "big idea", and delivering a talk of a lifetime.

Learning Objectives:
• Understand how to develop a TEDx idea that is individual, universal, and simple
• Can find TEDx speaking opportunities in my area and determine which are a good fit for me
• Am able to prepare a TEDx application that makes a strong case for my talk.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Wendler, PsyD

Daniel Wendler, PsyD

Postdoctoral Fellow, Deep Eddy Psychotherapy
Dan is a two-time TEDx speaker, psychologist, and best-selling author. He's been featured by Bloomberg Businessweek, the American Psychological Association, and more for his work in helping behavioral health professionals find career success and grow their professional impact. He... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 2
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

How to Hide the Eugenic Empire: Histories of Eugenics in Western Psychology
This presentation will review centrality of scientific and social eugenics movement in development of Western psychology. Eugenics or “science of racial betterment” was central in foundations of American psychology, including in use of racial and gender comparisons, statistics, testing, vocational tracking, animal experimentation, behaviorism, and many other approaches. Many of its most problematic practices supported rather than resisted racist, sexist, colonial, and other oppressive social ideologies. Specific focus will be given to epistemological views in early American and Western psychology that led to subsequent research and applied practices, which have been termed violent, unjust, and problematic. The context of Hawaii and its history will be used to frame this presentation in relation to colonization-based eugenic standpoints versus efforts to resist and challenge these perspectives. The audience will be invited to consider ways in which eugenics has shaped mental health science and practice, and to envision new pathways toward developing psychologies of social justice and decolonization. Concepts related to colonialism/decolonialism, liberation, critical psychology, human sciences, and indigeneity will be especially emphasized.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identity and apply understanding of eugenic history in psychology to evaluation of past and present day mental health research and practices.
  • Evaluate eugenic epistemological values in relation to socio-historic histories specific to Hawaiian context.
  • Examine and integrate decolonial, liberation, critical and indigenous standpoints in science and practice of psychology and mental health.
References:

Yakushko, O. (2019). Eugenics and its evolution in Western psychology. Psychotherapy and Politics International. 
Gaztambide, D. J. (2019). A people’s history of psychoanalysis: From Freud to liberation psychology. Lexington Books.
Watkins, M., & Shulman, H. (2008). Toward psychologies of liberation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan
Saini, A. (2019). Superior: The return of race science. Beacon Press.
Tucker, W. H. (1996). The science and politics of racial research. University of Illinois Press.
Immerwahr, D. (2019). How to hide an empire: A short history of the greater United States. Random House.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Oksana Yakushko, PhD

Oksana Yakushko, PhD

Professor, Pacifica Graduate Institute
Oksana Yakushko, PhD is a licensed psychologist and professor of clinical psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. Her research has focused on issues related to migration, gender, and multicultural psychology. Her recent scholarship has shifted to studying the impact of eugenics... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 4
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

Diversity: Social, Emotional, and Cultural Implications of Raising a Deaf Child
Deafness is an invisible disability that not many can understand the implications it has on an
individual’s social and emotional understanding. The diversity within the d/Deaf culture is vast
with a long history of oppression. Over 90% of babies who are born deaf are born to parents
who are hearing, which means access to language, learning, and reading can be a long,
challenging road. In this presentation, we will look at the spectrum of language approaches,
cultural diversity within deafness, history of Deaf culture, and how to best support families who
have a child with hearing loss as professionals.

Learning Objectives
1. Attendees will understand the language opportunities for children who are deaf and hard
of hearing and the choices families are required to make early on in a child’s life.
2. Attendees will be able to describe the diversity within the d/Deaf culture and the role this plays
on a child’s identity as a d/Deaf individual
3. Attendees will gain information about the Hawaii deaf community, services, and how to best
support families who have children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Christy Chadwick

Christy Chadwick

Founder/Director, Deaf Education Awareness Foundation
Christy Chadwick holds a Masters in Deaf Education from Washington University School ofMedicine in St. Louis from the Program of Audiology and Communication Sciences (PACS). InNovember she will graduate with her Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy from NorthcentralUniversity. Christy... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 6
  Workshop

1:00pm HST

Navigating the Mental Health System
Participants will learn some of the most effective ways to work within the mental health system as a provider of services. Many of these “tips of the trade” are transferrable to consumers and family members that may need assistance. State and private systems of care will be discussed including jargon that is essential in navigating services and systems. The basics of trauma informed care will be reviewed when working with consumers. Trauma informed management will also be addressed as a concept for taking care of staff in the workplace.

Building relationships with the various networks of care is the basis for this workshop. What does client driven mean and what does this look like in practice? In navigating we have kuleana to advocate for our consumers and the workshop will outline the various ways in which we strive to provide the highest quality of care.

An emphasis will be suicide awareness and prevention as a core competency for mental health and substance use providers. Participants will have an opportunity to practice a self-care activity which can improve sustainability for practitioners. When we are taking care of ourselves and centered in strength then we can view our work as blessings and opportunities versus burdens.

Workshop Objectives 
As a result of this program, participants will:
  • learn about the process of accessing care mental health and substance use services in Hawaii
  • learn about the eligibility criteria for most state operated and private providers of care in Hawaii.
  • gain an understanding for the importance of continuity of care between and across systems.
  • gain knowledge in the power of networking and building relationships in the mental health field and understand the benefits to the consumer (s).
  • experience a self-care experience and learn how to apply it in their practice.
  • be able to identify risk factors for individuals that may be at risk for suicide.
  • be able to communicate the basic principles of Trauma Informed Care (TIC).

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Rhoads Merriam, LCSW, CSAC

Kathleen Rhoads Merriam, LCSW, CSAC

Mental Health Supervisor, Windward Community Mental Health Center
Kathleen R. Merriam, LCSW, CSAC has worked in the mental health field for 37 years. She has worked in 4 state mental health systems and with various international systems of care. She moved to Hawaii in 2003 from working as the International Training Director for Fountain House, NYC... Read More →
avatar for Mestisa Gass, PsyD

Mestisa Gass, PsyD

Program Director, Mental Health America of Hawaii
Mestisa C. Gass, PsyD, is the Program Director for Mental Health America of Hawaii. Her education and experience have been focused on diverse populations including inpatient acute adolescent care, community mental health, and military mental health. She is Co-chair for the American... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 5
  Workshop

1:00pm HST

Meditation and Hypnosis in the Treatment of Trauma
Experiential techniques can be of great benefit alone and in combination with cognitive-behavioral and exposure approaches to trauma treatment. Meditation can be helpful in reducing reactivity to everyday triggers, improve sleep, and recover a sense of calm and comfort in the life of the traumatized patient. Hypnosis can be helpful in reassociating a comfortable emotional state with past trauma memories, breaking the conditioned negative response formed with the original trauma, as well as forming new cognitive schema to replace the old conditioned imagery. Together, meditation and hypnosis are powerful tools to assist the patient to overcome past traumas and formulate new pathways to move forward in more productive ways. Research, theory, and specific techniques useful for single and complex trauma will be taught and practiced so that these skills will be able to be employed in your practice following the workshop.

Learning Objectives:
Attendees will learn to:
  • conceptualize acute and chronic trauma as a learned conditioned response that can be reconditioned through experiential self-help training methods.
  • employ specific experiential techniques, including hypnosis and meditation, that can be effective on their own and in combination with other evidence-based trauma treatments in helping their patients overcome trauma symptoms.
  • apply techniques that not only assist with helping patients who have experienced trauma, but that can be applied to a wide range of distress.

Research Citations:
Rotaru TȘ, Rusu A. A Meta-Analysis for the Efficacy of Hypnotherapy in Alleviating PTSD Symptoms. Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2016;64(1):116-36. doi: 10.1080/00207144.2015.1099406. PMID: 26599995.
Cardenia et al (2009). Hypnosis (Ch. 17). In Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for the Studies of Traumatic Stress. E. Foa, T. Keane, M. Friedman, J. Cohen (Eds). Guilford Press: NY.
Gallegos, A. M., Crean, H. F., Pigeon, W. R., & Heffner, K. L. (2017). Meditation and yoga for posttraumatic stress disorder: A meta-analytic review of randomized controlled trials. Clinical psychology review, 58, 115–124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2017.10.004
Hilton, Lara, Alicia Ruelaz Maher, Benjamin Colaiaco, Eric Apaydin, Melony E. Sorbero, Marika Booth, Roberta M. Shanman, and Susanne Hempel, Meditation for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 2017. https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR1356.html.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for James Spira, PhD, MPH, ABPP

James Spira, PhD, MPH, ABPP

Director, Pacific Behavioral Health
Dr. Spira is a Licensed Psychologist (HI, CA), in private practice (Pacific Behavioral Health), and 2017 President of the Hawaii Psychological Association. He obtained his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley with a specialty in Health Psychology, and completed postdoctoral... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 1
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

EMDR
This workshop covers all the basic information therapists and clients want and need to know about EMDR, which is reflected in our learning objectives. This workshop thus addresses what EMDR is, who is appropriate for EMDR, how therapists prepare clients for EMDR, how therapists use EMDR, and what therapists do if EMDR doesn't work. In addition, we will briefly describe what EMDR Basic Training involves and what is required for Certification in EMDR.

The presenters are therapists who are experienced in the use of EMDR for a wide range of client problems. They work as a team to teach EMDR to other therapists. They consult with other therapists about EMDR and work with them to become certified in EMDR and approved consultants.

Learning Objectives
By attending this workshop, participants will be able to explain:
1. What EMDR is.
2. Which clients are appropriate for EMDR.
3. How therapists prepare clients for EMDR.
4. How therapists use EMDR.
5. What therapists do if EMDR doesn't work.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Terence C. Wade, PhD

Terence C. Wade, PhD

Founder, EMDR Hawaii
Terence C. Wade, Ph.D., and Darlene K. Wade, LCSW, have practiced psychotherapy in Honolulu for over 25 years. They have used EMDR since 1991, and they founded EMDR Hawaii in 1992. They are Certified in EMDR and Approved Consultants by the EMDR International Association. They are... Read More →
avatar for Darlene K. Wade, LCSW

Darlene K. Wade, LCSW

Founder, EMDR Hawaii
Terence C. Wade, Ph.D., and Darlene K. Wade, LCSW, have practiced psychotherapy in Honolulu for over 25 years. They have used EMDR since 1991, and they founded EMDR Hawaii in 1992. They are Certified in EMDR and Approved Consultants by the EMDR International Association. They are... Read More →
avatar for Kim Ala'ilima, LMFT

Kim Ala'ilima, LMFT

Kalaloa Counseling, LLC
Kim Ala'ilima LMFT is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Certified EMDR Therapist and Consultant in Training.In my twenty year practice with children, adults, and couples, I have utilized EMDR in conjunction with multiple mind-body interventions, using Somatic Resourcing, Thought... Read More →
avatar for Cara Lucey, Psy.D.

Cara Lucey, Psy.D.

Clinical Psychologist, Cara Lucey Psy D
Cara Lucey, Psy.D., is a clinical psychologist in Honolulu, Hawaii. I was born and raised on the island of Oahu in Kaneohe. My introduction to EMDR began while working with interfamilial sexual abuse. I was formally trained with Shapiro's EMDR model in 2014 and began using EMDR as... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 1:00pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 3
  Workshop

2:30pm HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345

Thursday October 21, 2021 2:30pm - 2:45pm HST
Room 7 - Break Room

2:45pm HST

Poster Session
Session Chair: Sean W. Scanlan, PhD, Director and Associate Professor, Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu

Inouye, Ann
Exploring MDMA-assisted therapy
Depending on the dose, setting, and individual, MDMA’s short-term psychoactive effects assists in regulating mood, increases trust within a psychotherapeutic environment, and emotional awareness; reducing the amygdala’s fear response. The effect is decreased hypervigilance and anxiety and improved states of consciousness. Multiple receptors, neurotransmitters, and intermediary processes account for MDMA's neurobiological effects. In 2017, a series of six phase 2 clinical trials looking at MDMA-AT for treatment-resistant PTSD found that 54% of MDMA full-dose participants no longer met the diagnosis of PTSD. No studies have been found or published on adverse effects MDMA-AT. With the upcoming completion of Phase 3 trials of MDMA-assisted therapy for PTSD, an FDA designated "breakthrough therapy", it is time to update the public understanding of MDMA and reassess its highly politicized history with a sagacity towards the evidence.

Nordstrom, Derek
Tai Chi Chuan Can Change Your Mind and Your Brain
Tai Chi Chuan is an ancient marital art that has been said to have positive physical and mental health benefits. Until recently, there weren’t any studies on the effects of Tai Chi Chuan practice upon the structures of the brain. In this poster, I present research which indicates that several parts of the brain are affected by the long-term practice of Tai Chi Chuan including the prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, occipital cortex, as well as brain white and gray matter. Moreover, I look at the important functions of the parts of the brain affected by Tai Chi Chuan practice, as well as enhanced functioning experienced by practitioners. I also look briefly at the positive affects Tai Chi Chuan has upon neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease and how Tai Chi Chuan can help with cognitive processes involving executive functioning including memory, as well as mood disorders including depression.

Rhines, Nuri
The role of pediatric neuropsychology in treating neurocognitive deficits in children and adolescents affected by child maltreatment
Even though the effects of child maltreatment are prevalent in society, children with abuse history make up a small percentage of patients that are being assessed and treated by pediatric neuropsychologists. Growing research has shown the ways child abuse can affect and change a developing brain, but there are few studies that take a comprehensive approach to looking at all domains of neurocognitive functioning that may be affected by child maltreatment. This review looks at the current research on the neurocognitive domains affected by child maltreatment and proposes the role pediatric neuropsychology should play in assessing and treating this population. There is limited research that looks at all the domains of neurocognitive functioning affected by child maltreatment. There are also some inconsistencies in which neurocognitive functions are affected by child maltreatment. Understanding a child’s cognitive strengths and weaknesses sets the foundation to implement early intervention strategies. It is currently not a requirement for children to undergo a neuropsychological evaluation when placed into foster care. A neuropsychological assessment should be a requirement of every child when they enter into the system to examine which resources are needed, and to determine placement for school and therapy.

Tavares, Ana
Exploring the role of the insula in the brain-behavior relationship
It is commonly taught that our brain has four lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital), each with their own specific function; However, the Insula is becoming increasingly referred to as the fifth lobe due to emerging research exposing its diverse functioning involving emotion, and the regulation of the body’s internal state. For my proposed poster, I will explore the importance of the Insula by examining its functional neuroanatomy, functioning, and the consequences of Insular dysfunction.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Inouye

Ann Inouye

Doctoral Student, Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
avatar for Derek Nordstrom, MA, MEd

Derek Nordstrom, MA, MEd

Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
avatar for Nuri Rhines

Nuri Rhines

Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student, Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University
Nuri Rhines is currently working towards her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. She is a Registered Behavioral Technician working with children and adults on the Autism spectrum. She is a Child Advocate and has experience advocating for children and youth in the foster care system... Read More →
AT

Ana Tavares

Doctoral Student, Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
I am a 2nd year doctoral student at the Hawaii School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu. I am originally from Stockton, California but moved to Hawaii to complete my undergraduate studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. I am interested in neuropsychology... Read More →
avatar for Sean W.  Scanlan, PhD

Sean W. Scanlan, PhD

Director and Associate Professor, HSPP at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Educating for positive change isn’t just a catchphrase for Chaminade University; it’s a way of life. Chaminade’s School of Education and Behavioral Sciences is interdisciplinary and forward-looking, designed to prepare students for success in the workplace and for service to... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 5
  Poster Session

2:45pm HST

Increasing Rapport and “Telepresence” During Telehealth Interactions With Youth/Families
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a variety of challenges for the delivery of mental health services for youth and families. As we all know, there has been a significant unforeseen shift to telehealth services, which has compelled providers to quickly adjust their approaches to fit this new and evolving virtual landscape. Fortunately, telemental health innovations have demonstrated effectiveness across a range of modalities. The literature in this area offers various strategies for mental health care providers looking to maximally leverage this technology. Additionally, research regarding telehealth suggests that its outcomes tend to be equivalent to that of in-person services, and it is already evident that our providers have overwhelmingly adopted innovative ways to facilitate effective telehealth service delivery. This presentation will offer recommendations derived from the evidence-base for increasing “telepresence” during telehealth interactions with youth and families, discuss policies regarding safety, and share lessons learned during the University of Hawaiʻi’s Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy—Child Section's implementation of telemental health services.

Learning Objectives:
(1) Gain an understanding of various telepractice recommendations;
(2) Determine which recommendations might be most useful to adopt in their own practice; and
(3) Feel more confident in their use of telemental health with youth and families.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Marina Matsui, MA

Marina Matsui, MA

Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, UH Manoa
Marina Matsui, M.A. is a staff member at the Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy—Child Section (C-CCBT), at the Department of Psychology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
avatar for Daniel Wilkie, PhD

Daniel Wilkie, PhD

Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, UH Manoa
Daniel Wilkie, Ph.D. is a staff member at the Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy—Child Section (C-CCBT), at the Department of Psychology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
avatar for Billie-Ann Bruce

Billie-Ann Bruce

Youth Partner for EPIC ʻOhana
Billie-Ann Bruce, A.S., A.A. is a Youth Partner for Effective Planning and Innovation Communication (EPIC) ʻOhana.


Thursday October 21, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 4
  Roundtable Session

2:45pm HST

ʻImi Pono: Native Hawaiian Wellbeing-Strengths and Challenges
Note: This presentation requires a passcode to enter the room.  The passcode is: 12345.

Increasing and sustaining wellbeing requires relevant and actionable data. Despite composing more than one-fifth of Hawaiʻi’s population, Native Hawaiians (NHs), as the Indigenous peoples of the state, are typically reported within the broader category of Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders. This is problematic as it masks the unique social realities of Native Hawaiians. In addition, data collected by state agencies are narrowly focused and primarily deficit-based.

To collect relevant and actionable data, Kamehameha Schools, Liliʻuokalani Trust, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs partnered with Marzano Research to administer a statewide survey from November 2020 to February 2021 to examine wellbeing in Hawaiʻi from a holistic, strengths-based perspective and utilized a Hawaiian culture-based wellbeing framework to represent the results. The wellbeing framework, Kūkulu Kumuhana, was first presented to NASW Hawaiʻi at the 2018 NASW Hawaiʻi conference as a poster. In 2021, we return with a proof of concept in its application. The framework is holistic, multi-dimensional, and promotes social justice. The six interconnected dimensions are Ea–Self determination, ‘Āina Momona–Healthy and productive land and people, Pilina–Mutually sustaining relationships, Waiwai –Ancestral abundance, collective wealth, ‘Ōiwi–Cultural identity and native intelligence and Ke Akua Mana—spirituality and the sacredness of mana.

This presentation highlights strengths and challenges regarding Native Hawaiian wellbeing to support programs, inform communities, and improve policy. We will explore commonalities and differences between Native Hawaiians and non-Hawaiian experiences statewide and across counties. Implications for the profession of social work on micro-, mezzo-, and macro-levels will be discussed.

Learning Objectives
At the end of the session, participants will be able to:
  • Describe the limitations of current data on Native Hawaiians
  • Explain the need to collect, analyze, and report out data that reflects the strengths of marginalized populations, particularly Native Hawaiians
  • Describe general commonalities and differences of wellbeing between Native Hawaiians and non-Hawaiians.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Pālama Lee, PhD, LCSW

Pālama Lee, PhD, LCSW

Director of Research and Evaluation, Liliʻuokalani Trust
Pālama Lee, PhD, LCSW is blessed to have worked for the Liliʻuokalani Trust (LT) for 10 years. He is a clinical social worker and an evaluator and researcher who offers a culturally responsive lens to illuminate the wellbeing of Native Hawaiians as the Indigenous Peoples of Hawaiʻi... Read More →
avatar for Brandon Ledward, PhD

Brandon Ledward, PhD

Principal Strategist, Strategy and Transformation Group, Kamehameha Schools
Brandon C. Ledward, Ph.D.was born and raised in Kailua, O’ahu, Brandon now resides with his wife and three young children in Kapolei. A graduate of the public school system, he went on to earn a MA and PhD in Anthropology at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. As part of Kamehameha... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 8
  Symposium

2:45pm HST

Adapting Groups to Hawai'i’s Communities
Abstract:
This 90-minute workshop will be led by a panel from the Hawaiian Islands Group Psychotherapy Society discussing some of the core principles of group psychotherapy and how they can be utilized in a range of groups we interact in within our communities. The five stages of group development will be discussed with examples of how they occur in different settings. Specific attention will be placed on the role of conflict within the stage of Storming as an opportunity to practice skills and grow as individuals and as a group. Leadership styles, challenges in group settings, and leader strategies will be explored. The role of boundaries, safety, and trust in group settings will be discussed with leadership strategies to develop these components.
Facilitating groups over online platforms with participants from multiple islands will be one of the examples explored to highlight group dynamics and stages of group development.
Program Description:
We interact in groups every day, as members, as leaders, and as observers. The dynamics of groups are always occurring and when we attend to those dynamics, we have an opportunity to participate in a more present and effective manner. This workshop will discuss core principles of group dynamics that occur in both in our community settings and in group therapy settings. Leadership styles, five stages of group development, dysfunctions of groups, and leader strategies will be presented and explored in this workshop.
Learning objectives:
  • Participants will be able to identify the 5 stages of group development
  • Participants will be able to understand the purpose of conflict and “storming” in group dynamics
  • Participants will be able to identify 3 leader strategies they can use in groups.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Renae Mendez, LCSW

Renae Mendez, LCSW

President, Hawaiian Islands Group Psychotherapy Society
Renae Mendez is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who has specialized in trauma treatment with individuals and groups for 15 years. She was previously a lead clinician in Tripler Army Medical Center’s Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) assisted in redesign and implementation of... Read More →
avatar for Mitch Berman, LMFT, CGP

Mitch Berman, LMFT, CGP

Hawaiian Islands Group Psychotherapy Society
Mitch Berman, LMFT, CGP is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Certified Group Psychotherapist practicing on Maui for 32 years. He is President of the Hawaiian Islands Group Psychotherapy Society and currently in private practice, working with individuals, couples, families... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Davenport, LMFT, CGP

Michelle Davenport, LMFT, CGP

Hawaiian Islands Group Psychotherapy Society
Michelle has always been interested in people’s life stories and enjoys connecting with people in deep and meaningful ways. She respects people’s individual life experiences and values their truth and authenticity. She enjoys the science of human behavior and, in that way, is... Read More →
avatar for Robin Spencer

Robin Spencer

Psychotherapist, Relational Therapy, llc
Robin Spencer earned her MA from Argosy University’s Marriage & Family Therapy program in 2007, her Certified Substance Abuse Counselor (CSAC) in 2010 and was licensed as an MFT in July 2011.  Robin worked with clients during their recovery process at Salvation Army Addiction Treatment... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 6
  Workshop

4:15pm HST

NASW-HI Annual Membership Meeting
Passcode to enter meeting is 12345

Speakers
avatar for Sonja Bigalke-Bannan, MSW, LCSW

Sonja Bigalke-Bannan, MSW, LCSW

Executive Director, National Association of Social Workers - Hawai'i Chapter


Thursday October 21, 2021 4:15pm - 5:00pm HST
Room 8

4:15pm HST

HIAMFT Annual Membership Meeting
Passcode to enter meeting is 12345

Speakers
avatar for John Souza, Jr., LMFT, DMFT

John Souza, Jr., LMFT, DMFT

President, Hawaiian Islands Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
Dr. John Souza, Jr. is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) and Clinical Fellow and Approved Supervisor with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). Dr. John specializes in working with young adults and their families.Born on O’ahu and raised... Read More →


Thursday October 21, 2021 4:15pm - 5:15pm HST
Room 9

4:15pm HST

HPA Annual Membership Meeting & Awards Ceremony
Passcode to enter meeting is 12345

Speakers
avatar for Nozanin Yusufbekova, PsyD

Nozanin Yusufbekova, PsyD

President, Hawai'i Psychological Association


Thursday October 21, 2021 4:15pm - 5:30pm HST
Room 7 - Break Room
 
Friday, October 22
 

8:00am HST

Make the Road by Walking: Sesame Street in Communities Resilience Resources
Description: Everyday life is full of challenges big and small! When you give children the tools to overcome obstacles, you help them learn and grow. Join the team from Sesame to explore resources from Sesame Street in Communities, a free digital platform with resources to share across your community. Our resources engage kids and adults in everyday moments and daily routines—from teaching early math and literacy concepts, to encouraging families to eat nutritious foods, to serious topics such as divorce and food insecurity. Spend some time in this workshop exploring resources you can use to address topics like health emergencies, traumatic experiences and racial justice!

Objectives:Over the course of this workshop, participants will
  • Learn about the platform Sesame Street in Communities,
  • Explore Sesame resources connected to Resilience and aligned topic pages and
  • Create learning opportunities to share with children, caregivers, and other providers!

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Brenda Windhausen, MA

Brenda Windhausen, MA

Professional Trainer, Sesame Street in Communities
I have been in the Early Childhood field since 1990 and have many fond memories of Muppets from the 60's and 70's! I taught Preschool for about 21 years in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom (NEK) https://www.vermont.com/northeast-kingdom/In 2012, I was hired to teach Preschool for Children's... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 1
  Keynote Workshop

8:00am HST

From Pro-Bono Covid-19 Project to Hawai'i Pro-Bono Mental Health Center: Continuing to Serve Our Underserved Hawaii Ohana
Description:
Introduction to the Hawai‘i Pro Bono Mental Health Center serving the under and uninsured for mental health services for the state of Hawai‘i.

Overview/Abstract:
We are excited to introduce you to the Hawai‘i Pro Bono Mental Health Center (HPBMHC)! The center was created after a COVID pro bono project was launched to help those affected emotionally by the pandemic who did not have access to insurance. The COVID Pro Bono project received over 88 requests and connected 45 who were under or uninsured to 28 local clinicians. The HPBMHC was created to continue providing to the under and uninsured who are struggling to cope with their current challenges they are presented with. The project is not suitable for extremely urgent circumstances including severe distress or emergency services. They are suited for those in need of short-term emotional support. The project is built from the generous donation of clinician’s time. We are asking every licensed Psychologist, Social Worker, Marriage & Family Therapist, and mental Health Counselor to provide one spot on their caseload for the center.

Learning Objectives:
As a result of this program, participants will be able to:
  1. describe the development of the Pro-Bono Covid-19 Project and its evolution to date.
  2. iterate the Project's learnings and successes, including the data to substantiate them.
  3. explain the transition plan and proposed creation of the Hawaii Pro-Bono Mental Health Center.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP has two Master's degrees; one in Community Clinical Psychology, the other in Marriage and Family Therapy. She is currently working towards her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Hawai’i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University... Read More →
avatar for Graham Taylor, PsyD

Graham Taylor, PsyD

Chief Learning Officer, Triad Behavioral Health
Dr. Graham Taylor is a licensed clinical psychologist and earned his Master of Arts (M.A.) degree from the University of Hawaii and his Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) degree from the American School of Professional Psychology in Honolulu, Hawaii Campus. Dr. Taylor is currently the... Read More →
avatar for Lawrie Ignacio, PsyD

Lawrie Ignacio, PsyD

Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice
Dr. Lawrie Ignacio is a licensed clinical psychologist and earned her Bachelor of Arts degree (B.A.) in English Literature from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. She received her Master's degree (M.A.) in Philosophy from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 4
  Roundtable Session

8:00am HST

Connecting, With A Twist
What I have found is many Pacific Islanders are hesitant to seek mental health services because they don’t see the connection to their values. Thinking With A Twist is designed to support people that struggle with symptoms or depression and anxiety get tools and support through services that are more relatable and even connect to their cultural views.

Many of us have heard this idea that “our relationship with ourselves, is reflected in the relationships all around us.” Growing up I remember being very aware of how everything was connected to each other. At one point I recall learning that grass was alive and became very concerned about how grass felt being stepped on. This concept was also reinforced by learning more about my Hawaiian culture, and that there is a reciprocal relationship between kanaka (people) and the 'āina (land). This perspective that everything is connected, has now become foundational in my life and work in mental health.

This workshop will highlight the relationship between natural elements (earth, water, air, fire) and people, to expand ideas of what mental health tools can be. Looking at mental health problems through the relatable lens of interconnectedness, is more inviting to communities, like Pacific Islanders. Stories, metaphors, and analogies will also be used to support beliefs about healing that can be helpful for providers and the people they serve.

Learning Objectives:
• Describe how a Hawaiian might understand interconnectedness through their lens.
• Discuss how integrating cultural values of interconnectedness could help make mental health services more relatable for pacific islanders.
• Identify at least 3 relationships between people and natural elements.
• Apply stories and metaphors to therapeutic tools and concepts, and make them more memorable.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Chasidy Wright, LMFT, CSAC

Chasidy Wright, LMFT, CSAC

Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Owner, Thinking With A Twist
Chasidy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and CSAC. A fun fact about Chasidy is that her Hawaiian name is Keka`au, which means "humble and humorous". She is gifted at helping people identify their own thinking patterns that may be keeping them stuck. She loves working with... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 2
  Workshop

8:00am HST

Intersectionality: Harm Reduction and Social Work Practice
This interactive workshop will explore the intersection of harm reduction tenets and social work values that inform harm reduction-based social work practice.  From theory to field, both harm reduction and social work share values such as social justice, dignity and worth of the person and the importance of relationships.  This workshop will review the history of harm reduction practice in both the U.S. and Hawaii will as well as concrete applications of harm reduction practices.  Data from evidence-based harm reduction services such as Housing First, Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion and Syringe Access programs will be highlighted as well as lessons learned from the Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center.

After this session, participants will be able to:
List and define three tenets of harm reduction as they apply to social work values
Describe three examples of harm reduction in practice
Identify and access harm reduction resources and services in Hawaii

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Lusk, MSW

Heather Lusk, MSW

ED, Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center
Heather Lusk, MSW, is the Executive Director of the Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center, which works to reduce harm, promote health, create wellness and fight stigma in Hawaii and the Pacific. Heather has over twenty-five years of experience dedicated to reducing health disparities... Read More →
avatar for David Shaku, MSW

David Shaku, MSW

Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center
David Shaku, MSW currently manages the LEAD, Housing First, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Division pre-treatment programs, and supervises the LEAD & Hepatitis C program staff at the Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center. He currently provides administrative support for staff working the... Read More →
avatar for Natalia Werkoff, MSW, LCSW, CSAC

Natalia Werkoff, MSW, LCSW, CSAC

LCSW, CSAC, Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center
Natalia Werkoff is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Substance Abuse Counselor working for Hawai`i Health and Harm Reduction Center. Natalia is a passionate advocate for providing client centered harm reduction services to those who use substances, including those who... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 5
  Workshop

8:00am HST

Nature as a Co-Therapist: Respect, Accountability, Inclusivity and Accessibility
This study explores the ethical challenges and solutions encountered in the practice of outdoor ecotherapy. A gap in the ecotherapy literature exists concerning the unique ethical issues faced in clinical practice and the specific solutions to achieve successful outcomes while in adherence to the APA Ethics Code (Hasbach, 2016; King, 2015; Revell & McLeod, 2016; Wolsko & Hoyt, 2012). Thus, the present This qualitative dissertation explored through qualitative interviews the firsthand experiences of 10 licensed 10 psychologists who have practiced outdoor ecotherapy while in adherence to the APA Ethics Code— offering both the common ethical challenges confronted, and solutions used across different client groups, practice settings, and cultural contexts.
Building on the past research regarding ethical outdoor ecotherapy practices, the thematic analysis examined challenges and solutions encountered in 14 domains that are related to elements of the APA ethics code including: minimum training, informed consent, screening, efficacy, payment, changes to the therapeutic frame, confidentiality, recording, accessibility, assessment, treatment planning, avoiding harm, documentation and liability insurance. Three additional domains are drawn from the previous ecotherapy literature: respectful integration, not pushing a nature agenda, and reciprocity. Findings identified common challenges confronted by outdoor ecotherapists and offered solutions used successfully in practice across different client groups, practice settings, and cultural contexts. This study's results may help clinicians who aim to incorporate nature into their therapeutic interventions.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Rose Friedheim

Rose Friedheim

The Wright Institute


Friday October 22, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am HST
Room 3
  Workshop

9:00am HST

Rebuilding Personal and Professional Resilience: A Search for Meaning, Not Closure
When faced with a pandemic and losses that remains ambiguous, our resilience is all that we have to help us cope. With monumental losses, personally, and professionally, we need to regain our strength and stability. The goal is not finding closure on this terrible time, but rather, finding some meaning in what we just experienced. Seeking closure only delays the resolution of loss for individuals as well as for larger societal systems of racism and social disparities. Valuing closure blocks not only our self-understanding but also the ability to empathize with the suffering of others and thus the momentum to make needed changes. If we believe people should just get over their loss and grief, then we have shut the door on our own ability to feel. Personally, and professionally, how do we find the flexibility to shift gears and change in the face of such ambiguity and loss? Dr. Boss offers six nonlinear guidelines that can help rebuild resilience to live with the stress of  ambiguity and uncertainty. They are based on the concepts of meaning, mastery, identity, ambivalence, attachment, and new hope (Boss, 2000,  2006, 2020). Dr. Boss also discusses the downside of resilience—it’s assumption of adaptation instead of systemic change. Questions and comments will be welcomed.

Learning Objectives:
1. Listening personally and professionally
2. Understanding the stress of loss, clear or ambiguous, and its effects
3. Increasing resilience by increasing tolerance for ambiguity
4. Accepting the paradox of absence and presence: both/and thinking.
5. Recognizing normal grief in abnormal times
6. Applying the six guidelines for resilience to live with loss and grief

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Pauline Boss, PhD

Pauline Boss, PhD

Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota
Pauline Boss, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota, family therapist, and consultant is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association and American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and a former president of the National Council on Family Relations... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 3
  Keynote Workshop

9:00am HST

Alternate Career Paths in Clinical Psychology
Panelists will describe their experiences pursuing careers outside of direct clinical service, and answer questions about navigating training and career development opportunities after internship.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will gain familiarity with career paths outside of direct clinical practice
2. Participants will learn about training and career development opportunities after clinical internship
3. Participants will learn about the role of clinical psychologists on interdisciplinary teams

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Janet Brito, PhD, PSY, LCSW, CST-S

Janet Brito, PhD, PSY, LCSW, CST-S

Founder, Hawaii Center for Sexual and Relationship Health
Dr. Janet Brito is an AASECT-certified sex therapist & supervisor who also has a license in clinical psychology and social work. She is a graduate of Pacifica Graduate Institute and completed her postdoctoral fellowship from the University of Minnesota Medical School, one of only... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Native Hawaiian Health, JABSOM
Dr. Andrea Hermosura is a Native Hawaiian Assistant Professor at the Department of Native Hawaiian Health and a licensed clinical psychologist at the Queen’s Medical Center and the Physician Center Mililani.
avatar for Allison Love, PhD

Allison Love, PhD

Allison R. Love, Ph.D., is Training Manager for PracticeWise, LLC. Dr. Love is dedicated to partnering with providers and systems to enhance the application of scientifically supported practice principles in frontline care. This includes providing training and consultation in the... Read More →
avatar for Trina Orimoto, PhD

Trina Orimoto, PhD

Clinical Psychologist, Child Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, UH Manoa
Dr. Orimoto is passionate about improving the lives of local families by making the best of psychological science available to everyone. She values her role as a scientist-practitioner-activist and currently serves as a psychologist at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Center... Read More →
avatar for Henri-Lee Stalk, PhD, JD

Henri-Lee Stalk, PhD, JD

Dr. Stalk is the Clinical Director of Adolescent and Child Services of Together CBT. She also trains psychiatry residents in CBT at Mount Sinai Hospital. She holds a dual degree in clinical psychology and law and specializes in anxiety, OCD, trauma, ADHD, and related conditions in... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 6
  Roundtable Session

9:00am HST

Connecting the Dots: Social Work and White Supremacy [cancelled]
Due to unforeseen circumstances, Ms. Garlock will not be available to conduct this workshop at the convention this Friday.  She will record the program at a later time and we will make it available to all convention attendees.

Systems created in Europe and the United States were founded on white supremacy, and continue to function in its perpetuation. How do we unlearn some of these things and untangle ourselves and our profession from these harmful roots? How do we actively practice our work and work to dismantle our practices at the same time? We cannot therapize our way out of colonization and white supremacy. What can we do?

It is hoped that this roundtable will be an opportunity to have this discussion as Social Work and other Behavioral Health professionals; to reflect on what can be done on a macro/community level to address white supremacy and its legacy in the world, and especially in the Nation of Hawai’i.

Learning Objectives:
● To reflect upon and describe two ways in which our individual and collective complicity in systems that uphold white supremacy
● To formulate responses to individual and collective responsibility for dismantling systems that uphold white supremacy
● To generate ideas about ways we can work as individuals and collectively to integrate anti-racist practices into our work

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Garlock

Jessica Garlock

COVID Navigator, Chaminade University
My name is Jessica Garlock and I am a haole settler who has been living in the sovereign Nation of Hawai’i since 2003. I have both a BSW and MSW in Social Work. I have worked very hard to center my work around those who have been historically excluded: BIPOC, people experiencing... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 5
  Roundtable Session

9:00am HST

Racism as the Diagnosis: Exploring Racism and Medical Trauma as Social Determinates of Health and Effective Strategies for Change
Racism as the Diagnosis: Exploring Racism and Medical Trauma as Social Determinates of Health and Effective Strategies for Change is a workshop that explores the impact of racism and medical trauma on health and health behaviors in the African American Community.

During the unprecedented Covid-19 pandemic, racial healthcare disparities have been a focal point for many with the CDC declaring race a social determinate for increased sickness and death from Covid-19. Covid-19 has highlighted the racial disparities in healthcare as well as the continued mistrust of the healthcare system within the African American Community. Not only are African Americans disproportionately represented in Covid-19 related deaths and hospitalizations, but also in mistrust of the healthcare system.

This workshop explores racism and medical trauma as primary factors to racial disparities in the African American community. Participants of this workshop will identify medical trauma and federal policy endured by African Americans throughout American history and explore how these events and policies have negatively impacted the black community's perspective on the healthcare system.

After gaining a foundational understanding of racism’s impact on healthcare in the black community, this workshop will discuss evidence-based, trauma-informed strategies practitioners and other healthcare professionals can implement to empower African Americans to build trust in their healthcare system and increase desired outcomes in health management, healthcare assessments, and discharge planning. This interactive workshop will utilize a combination of videos, polls, and group chat to keep workshop participants engaged.

Objectives
  •  Explore African American history of medical trauma that contributes to healthcare disparities and mistrust of the healthcare system.
  • Discuss the impact of medical trauma on health behaviors and perceptions in African American communities.
  • Review the present-day impact of racism on health in African American communities.
  • Discuss effective strategies that can be utilized by practitioners to promote healthcare equality and address medical trauma and mistrust of the healthcare system.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Brittany Works, LMSW, CTP-I

Brittany Works, LMSW, CTP-I

Executive Director, Matters of Our Mind, LLC
Brittany is the Executive Director of Matters of Our Mind, LLC, and serves as a consultant for community and corporate leaders to address structural racism, implicit bias, and mental health in the workplace by providing evidence- based models that promote trauma-informed care, and... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 10:30am HST
Room 2
  Workshop

9:00am HST

Appearance-Reality and Process in a Clinical Context
Neuropsychologist Aldrich Chan examines how conscious experience of reality is shaped by the limits and illusions (“veils”) of sensation, perception, emotion, cognition, sociocultural systems, and the self. In this didactic, he will explore these "veils of consciousness" and build upon relevant theories in service of improving the accuracy of conceptualizing mental processes. Furthermore, he will teach a novel clinical tool, guided by modern research in neuroscience, that may assist with processing information at various levels of human experience.

Learning objectives -
1. Identify the limitations and illusions ("veils") within biopsychosocial processes.
2. Apply knowledge of "veils" in the context of clinical practice.
3. Conceptualize mental processes through an integrated perspective.
4. Apply "Spatiotemporal model" for conceptualization
5. Apply a novel therapeutic method ("cycling") in relation to these findings.
6. Identify meaning through a biopsychosocial-existential lens and implement them through an ACT based approach.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Aldrich Chan, PsyD

Aldrich Chan, PsyD

Founder, Center for Neuropsychology and Consciousness
Dr. Chan is a Clinical Neuropsychologist, Author of Reassembling Models of Reality: Theory and Clinical Practice, and founder of the Center for Neuropsychology and Consciousness (CNC), a practice in Miami, Florida that provides neuropsychological and psychological services. In addition... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 12:15pm HST
Room 4
  Keynote Workshop

9:00am HST

Fostering Openness, Awareness, and Values-Based Living with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Do you find that your clients struggle to change their thoughts and feelings, only to stay stuck in unhelpful patterns? Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a “third wave” contextual behavioral therapy designed to help clients step out of the cycle of experiential avoidance and control, and instead become more open, aware, and engaged in values-based living.

In this workshop, geared toward all levels of prior ACT training, we will begin with a brief exploration of the theory underlying ACT, including the role of human language in suffering and the importance of understanding human behavior in context. We’ll then take a stroll through the core processes of ACT - acceptance, cognitive defusion, present moment awareness, perspective-taking, values, and committed action - and practice experiential exercises and metaphors that can be used to help clients build psychological flexibility.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
:
1. Define psychological flexibility and discuss the contextual behavioral theory underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).
2. Discuss the pitfalls of using control and experiential avoidance strategies in response to human suffering.
3. Describe the ACT core processes of acceptance, cognitive defusion, and self-as-context, and their benefits in fostering openness and awareness.
4. Define “values” in the context of ACT and identify the benefits of values-focused interventions.
5. Define “committed action” and its relationship with values.
6. Describe experiential methods of increasing psychological flexibility in clinical practice.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Debbie Sorensen, PhD

Debbie Sorensen, PhD

Clinical Psychologist, ACT and CBT Specialist, Private Practice
Debbie Sorensen, Ph.D. was planning to visit Hawaii for the first time ever in 2020. Her trip was cancelled due to COVID, so she’s excited to join you from afar! Debbie is a psychologist in private practice in Denver, Colorado with a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Anthropology from the University... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 9:00am - 12:15pm HST
Room 1
  Keynote Workshop

10:30am HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345

Friday October 22, 2021 10:30am - 10:45am HST
Room 7 - Break Room

10:45am HST

Collaborative-Dialogic Practice Across Contexts and Cultures
Have you ever wondered how to successfully communicate with someone who sees the world from an entirely different angle than you do? Often the chasm seems impossible to navigate, even with the best of intentions. Whether you work in a boardroom, schoolroom, therapy room, or community organization, Collaborative-Dialogic Practices offers a humanizing approach to facilitating dialogues that make a difference in our fast-changing, diverse, and ever-shrinking world.
These practices encourage relationships and conversations that create a generative space and promote meaningful transformations, even in the most difficult situations. This approach involves an epistemological and mindset shift in how we think about ourselves, the people we meet, what we do together, and how we do it. Grounded in social constructionism, the main feature of the practice, the philosophical stance, guides the professional in particular ways of being, talking, thinking, and acting with others. Rather than assuming an expert position of authoritative knowledge, collaborative practitioners use curiosity, not-knowing, and uncertainty to engage others in meaningful dialogue that generates new understandings, informing future possibilities that were previously unimagined by either person alone. In this workshop, participants will learn the foundations of forming collaborative relationships, including the philosophical and practical foundations. If Zoom breakout rooms are available, they will also have a chance to practice this essential skill in small groups.

Learning Objectives:
After attending this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Articulate the theoretical and philosophical foundations for forming collaborative-dialogic conversations.
2. Implement the key skills needed to facilitate collaborative-dialogic conversations, including dialogic curiosity and therapist positioning.
3. Apply collaborative-dialogic practices to better facilitate communication between people from differing cultures and/or contexts.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Gehart, PhD

Diane Gehart, PhD

Professor, California State University, Northridge
Diane Gehart, PhD, Professor, California State University, Northridge, and Director, Institute for Therapy that Works. She has authored numerous works, including Mastering Competences in Family Therapy, Theory and Treatment Planning in Counseling and Psychotherapy, and Mindfulness... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 3
  Keynote Workshop

10:45am HST

Hip Hop Therapy
This training will introduce the intersections of Hip-Hop culture and healing, through the theoretical framework and clinical applications of Hip-Hop Therapy. This training will also discuss how and why this treatment model can be effective in treating trauma in a culturally responsive way.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
  • name and identify the fundamental elements of Hip-Hop Culture.
  • articulate what constitutes Hip Hop Therapy.
  • explain how and why Hip-Hop therapy is effective in treating Trauma.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Brittani Williams, LCSW

Brittani Williams, LCSW

Psychotherapist, Courage over Comfort Counseling
Brittani Williams is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Social Work Entrepreneur, Educator and Hip-Hop head. She received her Bachelor’s in Sociology from The University of Southern California and a Master’s in Social Work from The University of Hawai’i at Manoa. Originally... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 2
  Keynote Workshop

10:45am HST

Access to Mental Health Care – Reaching Diverse Communities
Access to mental health care is complicated by many factors, the most obvious being availability of practitioners. Communities that are isolated either by physical distance or cultural differences are often the last to receive care. Diversity factors ranging from skin color, ethnicity, religion and culture affect not only the availability of appropriately trained professionals but the attitudes held by these community members towards receiving mental health care.
Darnell Lamont Walker, a writer and filmmaker, has documented the global perceptions of individuals towards experiencing mental health disorders and seeking care. Dr. Judi Steinman has worked with communities around the country to improve access to mental health care through prescriptive authority for qualified doctors of psychology. Together, the presenters will discuss the international launch of their film project documenting the need for more and better mental health care. The story begins in Hawai`i and will feature individuals from the mental health care profession, legislators who are committed to improving mental health care access and members of the disenfranchised, who wait for help.
Attendees will have an opportunity to discuss their own experiences in working with clients and patients from diverse backgrounds. Discussions will focus on penetrating barriers of communication and improving access to care for people of color.

Learning Objectives:
Attendees will be able to:
1. Recognize and describe cultural and ethnic attitudes that influence their perception of mental health disorders and therapeutic treatments
2. Identify characteristics that influence how people of diverse backgrounds perceive health care provided by providers from different backgrounds.
3. Describe how prescribing psychology addresses cultural and ethnic barriers to successful mental health care.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Darnell Lamont Walker

Darnell Lamont Walker

Writer, Filmmaker and Artist
Darnell Lamont Walker is a writer, filmmaker, and artist, currently producing children’s media, creating content that allows all children to see themselves. Blue’s Clues and You, Two Whats?! And a Wow!, and Karma’s World are among the many shows Darnell has written for and supported.Although... Read More →
avatar for Judith Steinman, PhD

Judith Steinman, PhD

Director, MS Program in Clinical Psychopharmacology, CSPP - Alliant International University
Dr. Steinman is the Immediate Past President of APA’s American Society for the Advancement of Pharmacotherapy (Division 55) for 2020 and 2021. She has been the director of the CSPP-Alliant International University the Master of Science in Clinical Psychopharmacology (MSCP) program... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 6
  Workshop

10:45am HST

Private Practice: A Guide to Building Your Own Business
Within this workshop we will present information regarding the process of starting a Private Practice as a Pre-Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in Hawaii.  This information is applicable to pre-licensed and licensed social workers, psychologists, and marriage and family therapists.  Presenters will discuss the process of establishing their businesses which seek to provide mental health therapy services to individuals, couples, and families in Hawaii, at an affordable rate.  Some topics covered in the presentation include: required paperwork and forms for submitting a business application in Hawaii, considerations for structuring your business (individual practice vs. shared practice, LLC vs. S-Corp), marketing, advertising and networking, payment and billing options (client self-pay vs. insurance), and HIPAA compliant telehealth providers vs. in-person services.  Participants will gain a better understanding of some of the benefits as well as the challenges that may become apparent when considering private practice, as opposed to working for a local agency, or a contracted clinician.  

Learning objectives:
  • Participants will learn about marketing and advertising strategies (i.e., generating referral sources to build client load, utilizing social media and search engines to advertise services)
  • Participants will become familiar with the logistics of the legal paperwork required for filing to start a business in Hawaii (taking into consideration: business name, business plan and structure, partnership vs. solely owned, LLC vs. S-Corp).
  • Participants will explore the benefits of telehealth vs. in-person services
  • Participants will review the state requirements to become licensed as a Marriage and Family Therapist or Licensed Clinical Social Worker and get a better understanding of the limitations of working as a pre-licensed clinician

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Dominique Bale, PsyD

Dominique Bale, PsyD

Dr. Dominique Bale is a Licensed Psychologist practicing in Kapolei, Hawaii and is the co-owner of Sakura Center for Psychological Assessment and Therapy. The practice has been open since 2018 and provides a combination of psychological assessment and therapy services with a primary... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Chow

Daniel Chow

Therapist, Hawaii Therapeutic Partners
Daniel graduated with his BA in Economics from UH Mānoa before moving on to complete his MS in Counseling Psychology from Chaminade University. His experience includes working as a behavioral support for children in the school setting, men recovering from addiction, and adults who... Read More →
avatar for Lena Jones, LCSW

Lena Jones, LCSW

Lena obtained her Masters of Social Work from the University of Hawai’i, at Manoa and has been practicing professionally for over 20 years. She has worked in behavioral health in a variety of community settings on Oahu including The Queen’s Medical Center, the Windward Oahu Community... Read More →
avatar for Micah Kobayashi

Micah Kobayashi

Therapist, Hawaii Therapeutic Partners
Micah graduated from UH Mānoa with his BA in Psychology. He then received his MS in Counseling Psychology from Chaminade University in 2020 with an emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy. His background includes working with high-need families, sexually abused adolescents, spouses... Read More →
avatar for Leena Mohapatra, PhD

Leena Mohapatra, PhD

Dr. Leena Mohapatra is a clinical neuropsychologist who recently started her private practice in Honolulu, Hawaii. Dr. Mohapatra has broad expertise working within hospitals, schools, and community settings conducting neuropsychological assessments, and providing consultations and... Read More →
avatar for Colin Moore

Colin Moore

Co-Founder, Hawaii Therapeutic Partners
Colin graduated from UH Mānoa in 2017 with a bachelor’s in Psychology and American Studies. He went on to receive his masters in Counseling Psychology from Chaminade University of Hawaii in 2020 with an emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy. His background includes working with... Read More →
avatar for Janet Thomas, PsyD

Janet Thomas, PsyD

Dr. Janet Thomas is a Clinical Psychologist practicing in Kapolei, Hawai’i and is the co-owner of Sakura Center for Psychological Assessment and Therapy. The practice has been open since 2018 and provides a combination of psychological assessment and therapy services with a primary... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 10:45am - 12:15pm HST
Room 5
  Workshop

12:15pm HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345

Friday October 22, 2021 12:15pm - 1:00pm HST
Room 7 - Break Room

1:00pm HST

Navigating Multiple Perspectives During Challenging Times
Navigating Multiple Perspectives During Challenging Times
    1. Culture and Science – Nexus or Disconnect?
    2. Includes discussion of Kama`aina Come Home and why this is so important
    3. Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow, and the Day After Tomorrow
Learning Objectives:
  • How do we learn from and understand multiple perspectives, increase understanding, recognize points of common impact, acknowledge cultural trauma, in a respectful way?
  •  How do we engage in the difficult discussions that are so important in informing perspective? What role do we play respectively and/or collectively?

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqui Hoover

Jacqui Hoover

Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer, Hawaii Island Economic Development Board
Jacqui Hoover serves concurrently as President (appointed 2005) of Hawaii Leeward Planning Conference and as the Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer (appointed 2008) of the Hawaii Island Economic Development Board.Prior to Hawaii Leeward Planning Conference, she was with... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:00pm HST
Room 6
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

Interconnected Lives, Global Pandemic, and Disparity of Resources: The Role of Psychotherapy
The COVID-19 pandemic brings to the forefront the complex interconnected dilemmas of globalization, health equity, economic security, environmental justice, and collective trauma, severely impacting those with less resources globally. Given the fact that psychotherapists may unwittingly function as the best ally of an economic and political system that perpetuates institutionalized racism and class discrimination, we need to utilize a set of principles, values, and practices that are not just palliative or after the fact but bring forth into the psychotherapeutic and policy work a politics of care. We need a strong call to promote and advocate for the broader continuum of health and critical thinking preparing professionals to meet the challenges of health equity, as well as economic and environmental justice. This presentation aims at examining these critical issues and developing a framework for psychotherapists to address these challenges by focusing on four interrelated dimensions: cultural values, social determinants of health, collective trauma, and the ethical and moral responsibility of psychotherapists.

Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to:
1. Describe the complex interconnected dilemmas of globalization, health equity, economic security, environmental justice, and collective trauma.
2. Explain how psychotherapists can utilize a set of principles, values, and practices to help those needing mental health services.
3. Discuss ways that psychotherapists can promote and advocate for the broader continuum of health and critical thinking
4. Describe the four interrelated dimensions: cultural values, social determinants of health, collective trauma, and the ethical and moral responsibility of psychotherapists

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Manijeh Daneshpour, PhD, LMFT

Manijeh Daneshpour, PhD, LMFT

Professor, Department of Couple and Family Therapy, Alliant International University
Dr. Manijeh Daneshpour is the systemwide couple and family therapy director and distinguished professor of marriage and family therapy at the California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP) of Alliant International University in California. She is also a licensed marriage and... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 1
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

Working with Clients Experiencing “Narcissistic Abuse”: Addressing the Impact of Antagonistic Personality Styles
Narcissism is the word of our time, yet there remains a lack of understanding, especially the way it impacts people in relationships with people who have antagonistic personality styles such as narcissism. The dearth of training on high-conflict personality styles, coupled with a reticence to “label” people who are close to the client but “not in the room”, has meant that many clients suffering from “narcissistic abuse” in familial, intimate, or workplace relationships don’t get the help they need. This workshop will offer the most up-to-date research on antagonistic personality styles, and provide a practical roadmap for working with clients with patterns of narcissistic abuse. You’ll discover how to identify the characteristics of narcissistic abuse that are often misdiagnosed; a holistic treatment approach that can be applied trans-theoretically; an actionable framework for educating clients about narcissism.  This program will cover: an overview of narcissism and other antagonistic personality styles including diagnostic issues, subtypes, assessment, treatment, impact on clinicians, co-morbidities; introduction of the term “narcissistic abuse” or “antagonistic relational stress”; the patterns associated with this clinical presentation, psychosocial impacts, differentiating and also accounting for the overlap between antagonistic relational stress and other comorbidities such as post-traumatic stress and anxiety disorders; overview of the dynamics of high conflict, antagonistic relationships; an integrated, transtheoretical model for working with clients experiencing antagonistic relational stress; clinician self-care and challenges when working with the persons experiencing these relationships.

Learning Objectives:

1.    Apply a holistic view of the dynamics of narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder, and “narcissism-adjacent” personality styles.

2.    Describe the phenomenon of narcissistic abuse/antagonistic relational stress.

3.    Explain the dynamics of narcissistic and other antagonistic relationships

4.    Utilize an actionable framework for working with clients experiencing narcissistic abuse.

5. Identify the specific challenges in working with individuals with antagonistic personality styles and/or those who are experiencing antagonistic relational stress.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Ramani Durvasula, PhD

Ramani Durvasula, PhD

Professor of Psychology, California State University, Los Angeles
Dr. Ramani Durvasula is a licensed clinical psychologist in Los Angeles, CA and Professor of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles, and the Founder and CEO of LUNA Education, Training & Consulting, a company that offers a range of programs focused on educating survivors... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 4
  Keynote Workshop

1:00pm HST

Hoʻā (Ignite) and Paper Session
Hoʻā (Ignite) and Paper Session
Session Chair: Sean W. Scanlan, PhD, Director and Associate Professor, Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu

Bronco READI: A leader's assessment tool for high-risk behaviors
Freed, Adam, Burg, Stephanie, Dawkins, Christacia & Ewing, Darius

Army Commanders strive to develop, maintain, and use the full range of human potential with their formations. In order to make use of this human potential, commanders must properly mitigate the myriad of risks that exist within the unit. The Bronco READI is a tool that aims to both standardize the assessment of risk across an Infantry Brigade Combat Team and to empower junior leaders to make decisions on how to best mitigate that risk going forward. The Bronco READI reiterates the role of the behavioral health team as a consultant and advisory body to the command, rather than a decision-making authority.

Finding strength after power based personal violence
Giroux, Danielle

This study examines the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault survivors in two rural contexts. The study utilized the community-based participatory research approach (CBPR) of photovoice, which combines qualitative focus groups with photos taken by participants, and culminated with an art gallery show as a form of social action. This project utilized a directed content analysis approach to analyze the data and generate new theories about survivorship and healing. Major findings that inform clinical practice include; the importance of social connections in the healing process, the need for formal and informal supports, the importance of nature in the healing process, and experiences of post traumatic growth (PTG) in the process of recovery.

Scoping review of polysubstance use: A call for interprofessional action
Macaraeg, Jethro, Hissain, Mohammad, Kovalick, Karyn, Kim, Esther, Smith, Tammie & Park, Mei Linn

The OD2A-C3 Project is a grant-funded program by the CDC Overdose Data to Action (OD2A) Project through the Hawaiʻi State Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration and is managed by a team from the Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. The Hawai’i Overdose Data to Action (OD2A) Care Coordination and Capacity Building (C3) project provides activities and resources for social workers and other health and human services providers to address opioid misuse, abuse, and overdose as well as polysubstance use, and co-occurring disorders. The project utilizes data on emerging trends and evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies to provide participants of the project activities with strategies, tools, and resources to improve their practice and reinforce an integrated healthcare approach. The project also coordinates with community partners to utilize the community’s commitment, resources, and skills to build on community strengths, local resources, and readiness to address prevention needs. Thus, the Hawaii C3 project increases awareness and education about the risks of opioids and strengthens state and local capacity to respond to the opioid epidemic.

Pace Groups: Evolving connection together
Gajiev, Elnur

As we step into a new frontier of providing care to members in our communities and beyond, we are tasked with responding to novel needs for those seeking support at varying levels. The advancement of health technologies over the course of the past few years have significantly impacted the greater landscape of mental healthcare services.
In addition to many individual services shifting online, we have seen a burgeoning need for group spaces—spaces in which people can gather together to connect with others undergoing similar life themes and challenges, spaces in which individuals can support one another through meaningful moments, and spaces in which growth is shared as a community. Pace, an online platform that offers supportive group spaces in an affordable, accessible, and equitable manner, aims to answer that need for providers and community members alike.
In this short Ignite presentation, we will explore Pace’s vision and mission, how Pace is affecting change for nonclinical populations, how Pace is empowering providers who serve as Group Facilitators, and how further growth may be posited within the field of online community-based mental health services.

Speakers
AF

Adam Freed, PsyD

25th Infantry Division, United States Army
avatar for Danielle Giroux

Danielle Giroux

Assistant Professor of Social Work, Hawaii Pacific University
Dr. Giroux is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Hawaii Pacific University. Originally from Ohio, Dr. Giroux graduated with her MSW from HPU in 2010. Following completion of her MSW she moved to Alaska to complete her PhD in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University... Read More →
avatar for Jethro Macaraeg

Jethro Macaraeg

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
SB

Stephanie Burg, MSW

25th Infantry Division, United States Army
CD

Christacia Dawkins

25th Infantry Division, United States Army
DE

Darius Ewing

25th Infantry Division, United States Army
avatar for Mohammad Didar Hossain, MSS, MSW

Mohammad Didar Hossain, MSS, MSW

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
Didar is a PhD student at the Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health at the University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa and an East-West Center Graduate Degree Fellow. He earned BSS in Social Welfare and two Master’s degrees in Social Welfare and Gerontology, all from the University of... Read More →
avatar for Karyn Kovalick

Karyn Kovalick

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
avatar for Esther Kim

Esther Kim

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
avatar for Tammie Smith, MPH

Tammie Smith, MPH

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
avatar for Mei Linn Park

Mei Linn Park

Overdose Data to Action Program, School of Social Work and Public Health, UH Manoa
avatar for Elnur Gajiev, PsyD

Elnur Gajiev, PsyD

Dr. Elnur Gajiev is a clinical psychologist, poet, and educator. He specializes in bringing together empirically-based, creative therapies to foster greater connection, purpose, and growth for individuals, groups, and organizations. Dr. El is a key pioneer in Spoken Word Poetry Therapy... Read More →
avatar for Sean W.  Scanlan, PhD

Sean W. Scanlan, PhD

Director and Associate Professor, HSPP at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Educating for positive change isn’t just a catchphrase for Chaminade University; it’s a way of life. Chaminade’s School of Education and Behavioral Sciences is interdisciplinary and forward-looking, designed to prepare students for success in the workplace and for service to... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 2

1:00pm HST

At a Distance: Child and Adolescent Practice through the Pandemic
Mental Health practice with children, adolescents and families is challenging under any circumstances, due to the complexity of the problems and systems involved.  During the pandemic, this greater complexity has meant additional challenges as clinicians try to meet the increasing needs of the youth population.  This panel discussion will feature clinicians who work with young people in a variety of practice settings, reflecting on what they have observed through the pandemic and providing their insights into what we may need to do in the future to support youth and families as we come out of the pandemic.  We hope to have a lively discussion, and audience input will be encouraged.

Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will be able to identify several common themes related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on youth and families across practice settings.
  • Participants will be able to describe one or two changes in referral patterns to public mental health programs in Hawaii that took place during the pandemic.
  • Participants will be able to discuss several problems related to children’s mental health that are likely to intensify as we come out of the pandemic.
  • Participants will be able to identify several ways practitioners can adjust their practice to be better able to respond to children’s needs during a pandemic.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP

Hawai'i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University of Honolulu
Jodie E. Gerson, MA, MS, CPM, CETP has two Master's degrees; one in Community Clinical Psychology, the other in Marriage and Family Therapy. She is currently working towards her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Hawai’i School of Professional Psychology at Chaminade University... Read More →
avatar for Trina Orimoto, PhD

Trina Orimoto, PhD

Clinical Psychologist, Child Center for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, UH Manoa
Dr. Orimoto is passionate about improving the lives of local families by making the best of psychological science available to everyone. She values her role as a scientist-practitioner-activist and currently serves as a psychologist at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Center... Read More →
avatar for Tammie Noelani Perreira, PsyD

Tammie Noelani Perreira, PsyD

Primary Care Psychologist, Waimanalo Health Center
Born and reared in rural Hawaii communities by Hawai'i family, nature and spirit, Dr. Perreira believes what is good for Hawai'i is good for humans. She is a product of her environment, ancestors and education. T. Noelani Perreira, Psy.D. is a Hawaiian psychologist licensed to practice... Read More →
avatar for Cheryl Andaya, PsyD

Cheryl Andaya, PsyD

Deputy Director/Director of Training, Family Strengthening Center
Dr. Cheryl Andaya is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the area of child maltreatment. She completed her internship at Atascadero State Hospital, a California maximum security forensic psychiatric facility. Her post-doctoral training was at Kapiolani Child Protection Center... Read More →
avatar for Kelsie Okamura, PhD

Kelsie Okamura, PhD

Assistant Professor, Hawai'i Pacific University
Dr. Kelsie H. Okamura is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and an Assistant Professor at Hawai’i Pacific University in the Department of Psychology. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and completed her predoctoral internship at... Read More →
avatar for Katlyn Hale, PsyD

Katlyn Hale, PsyD

Clinical Psychologist, Department of Education, West Hawai'i District
Dr. Katlyn Hale earned her Psy.D. in clinical psychology at Pacific University School of Professional Psychology in Hillsboro, OR. She completed her Predoctoral Internship with HI-PIC at the Department of Education, West Hawaii District, where she was later employed. Since 2014 Dr... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 3
  Roundtable Session

1:00pm HST

Resilient Communities, Schools and Families: Supporting Schools, Strengthening Keiki and ʻOhana
The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified existing challenges for communities, schools, students and families, especially in disadvantaged, rural, remote areas of Hawaiʻi. These students and families may face economic and housing instability, food insecurity and at risk for increased childhood trauma. The Resilient Communities, Schools and Families project (RCSF) is an innovative initiative to strengthen partnerships, promote
trauma sensitive practices and enhanced coordination of wrap-around prevention/intervention services for children and families. This project focuses on the wellbeing of the whole child through wrap-around services, student support teams, school teams and professional skills development around social emotional learning and
trauma informed care. RCSF brings together partners: Ceeds of Peace, The Hawaiʻi Afterschool Alliance, Papa Ola Lōkahi, Kamehameha Schools, HawaiiKidsCAN, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Center for Place Based Social Emotional Development and the Hawaiʻi Department of Education together in support of five Title I elementary schools serving large Native Hawaiian student populations. The project builds upon the best practices of trauma-sensitive approaches and the Community Schools model to create sustainable conditions for schools to better serve students and families, ensure even the most at-risk youth have access to services necessary to thrive within their school, homes and communities, and develop a tailored operational approach that builds capacity for schools to strengthen community partnerships. Join us for this workshop to learn about the Resilient Communities, Schools and Families project.

Learning Objectives:
After this presentation participants will:
1. Become acquainted with the Resilient Communities, Schools and Families project.
2. Be able to articulate community-based collaboration and strategies to support schools, students and families.
3. Leave with an understanding of this multi-layered approach to supporting social emotional development and addressing trauma.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW

Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW

Program Coordinator, Ceeds of Peace
Dawn Rego-Yee, MSW (she/her) was born and raised in Hilo on Hawaiʻi Island and identifies as wahine Hawaiʻi, mother, wife, daughter, aunty, hula learner, ʻāina aloha and social justice worker. She is a trauma informed care trainer, social justice consultant and project manager... Read More →
avatar for Ivee Cruz, MA

Ivee Cruz, MA

Education Director, Ceeds of Peace
Ivee is an educator, facilitator, counselor, advisor, and instructor. Ivee holds a Bachelors in Global & International Studies and Sociology from the University of California Santa Barbara. She has a Masters in International Educational Development from Teachers College, Columbia... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm HST
Room 5
  Workshop

2:30pm HST

Break
Passcode to enter break room is 12345

Friday October 22, 2021 2:30pm - 2:45pm HST
Room 7 - Break Room

2:45pm HST

If We Follow the Science, We Need to Develop a New Narrative of Mental Health
In 1980, when the American Psychiatric Association published the third edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, it adopted a "disease model" for diagnosing and treating mental disorders. The public was soon told that major mental disorders were due to chemical imbalances in the brain, and that psychiatric drugs fixed those imbalances. Today, science tells us that model has failed. Research failed to validate mental disorders as discrete illnesses; the chemical imbalance theory has been abandoned; and the burden of mental illness in our society has greatly increased. There is evidence that drug treatment increases the chronicity of disorders over the long term. What is needed now is a new narrative of mental health, one that tells of how there are many pathways to psychiatric difficulties, and that environmental factors--diet, exercise, finding meaning in life, work, and belonging to a community--can play a big role in helping people get well.

Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to:
  • Explain  the reasons that the APA adopted a disease model
  • Describe what the research into chemical imbalances found
  • Explain how the effort to "validate" the disease model categories failed
  • Discuss the evidence telling of how the burden of mental disorders has dramatically increase since 1980
  • Describe  alternatives to the disease model that are springing up, the nature of those efforts, and their outcomes

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Whitaker

Robert Whitaker

Founder and President, Mad in America Foundation
Robert Whitaker is the author of four books, and coauthor of a fifth, three of which tell of the history of psychiatry. In 2010, his Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness won the U.S. Investigative Reporters and Editors... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 3
  Keynote Workshop

2:45pm HST

Introduction to Relapse Prevention: Lessons Learned from Psychology
Many modalities have demonstrated effectiveness in treating substance use disorders (SUDs). Mental health providers fill an important role in providing direct care as well as supporting referrals, especially in rural communities. In this program we will focus on examples of relapse prevention (RP), including: the cognitive-behavioral model of the relapse process, factors that predict or increase risk of relapse, and concrete strategies to prevent or recover from relapse.

Learning objectives:
1.       Describe the goals of relapse prevention (RP) efforts
2.       Identify cognitive aspects of RP (e.g., “abstinence/goal violation effect”)
3.       Describe behavioral aspects of RP (e.g., stimulus control strategies)
4. Recognize the impact of stigma and limited resources on substance use efforts

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Logan, PhD, CSAC

Diane Logan, PhD, CSAC

Dr. Logan earned her Ph.D. from the University of Washington and completed her postdoctoral training at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University. She provided integrated behavioral health care and coordinated substance use services at West Hawaii Community... Read More →
avatar for Jason Kilmer, PhD

Jason Kilmer, PhD

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington
Dr. Jason Kilmer is an Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington (UW), and serves as an investigator on several studies evaluating prevention and intervention efforts for alcohol, marijuana, and other drug use by college students. In... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 6
  Keynote Workshop

2:45pm HST

Becoming a Specialist: Paths to Board Certification for Psychological Service Providers
A specialty is a defined area in the practice of psychology that connotes special competency acquired through an organized sequence of formal education, training and experience. Since 1947, the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) is the primary organization for specialty board certification in psychology, encompassing 15 recognized specialty areas. Despite numerous benefits to board certification for both providers and consumers of psychological services, only 4% of licensed psychologists in the United States are board-certified with some states (such as Hawaii) being underrepresented in the regional distribution of certified specialists. Understanding the requirements, examination process, and value of board certification is imperative for growing the field’s population of certified specialists.
This roundtable discussion will overview the process, benefits, and challenges of board certification for psychologists and trainees at any stage of their professional development. Five locally-based board-certified psychologists in various specialty areas will share their background, how their current roles relate to their professional interests, and advice for professionals interested in pursuing board certification.

Learning objectives:
• Describe the process for obtaining specialty board certification through ABPP
• List the unique benefits conferred by board certification for providers of psychological services
• List the various areas of specialization recognized by ABPP
• Learn methods for initiating the board certification process at various stages of professional development

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Malik Khaddouma, PhD, ABPP

Alexander Malik Khaddouma, PhD, ABPP

Staff Psychologist, Counseling and Student Development Center, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
Alexander Malik Khaddouma, PhD, ABPP is a licensed, board-certified staff psychologist at the Counseling and Student Development Center at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa in Honolulu, Hawai'i, where he also serves as the Coordinator of Outreach Services. He received his PhD in... Read More →
avatar for Shiloh Jordan, PhD, ABPP

Shiloh Jordan, PhD, ABPP

Psychology Training Director, VA Pacific Islands Health Care System
Name: Shiloh Jordan, PhD, ABPPBoard Certification: Counseling PsychologyAffiliation: VA Pacific Islands Healthcare SystemEmail: shiloh.jordan@va.govBio: Shiloh E. Jordan, PhD, ABPP is the Director of Training for Psychology at the VA Pacific Islands HealthCare System (VAPIHCS) and... Read More →
avatar for Tanya D'Avanzo, PhD, ABPP-Cn

Tanya D'Avanzo, PhD, ABPP-Cn

Clinical Neuropsychologist, Private Practice
Name: Tanya D’Avanzo, PhD, ABPP-CnBoard Certification: Clinical NeuropsychologyAffiliation: Private PracticeEmail: drtanya@hawaii.rr.comBio: Tanya J. D’Avanzo, PhD, ABPP-Cn is a board-certified clinical neuropsychologist. She attained a B.S.degree in biopsychology with a minor... Read More →
avatar for Marvin Acklin, PhD, ABPP, ABFP, ABAP

Marvin Acklin, PhD, ABPP, ABFP, ABAP

Clinical, Assessment & Forensic Psychology, Independent Practice
Name: Marvin Acklin, PhD, ABPP, ABFP, ABAPBoard Certification: Clinical and Forensic PsychologyAffiliation: Pacific Forensic Associates, Inc.Email: acklin@hawaii.eduBio: Dr. Acklin is a clinical, assessment and forensic psychologist practicing in Hawaii since 1989. Dr.Acklin is board... Read More →
avatar for Tanecia Blue

Tanecia Blue

Whole Health Program Manager, VA Pacific Islands Healthcare System
Tanecia Blue, PhD, ABPP is a board-certified clinical health psychologist who has mentored several others in the board-certification process, as well as encourages others to engage in the board certification process. Dr. Blue currently manages a cultural transformation program focused... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 2
  Roundtable Session

2:45pm HST

A Journey to Health Equity through Community-Building in Papakōlea
Description of the Program:
Traditionally, Native Hawaiians were a vibrant and robust population. Due to the consequences of colonization, Native Hawaiians are now disproportionately impacted by chronic diseases, such as dementia, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases when compared to the other major ethnic groups in Hawaiʻi. The following presentations highlight studies that helped one Native Hawaiian homestead community successfully pursue its long-term community goal of empowering its kūpuna (elders) and their families to achieve health equity. The model implemented by Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi in the Native Hawaiian homestead communities of Papakōlea is one that was grounded in community-based participatory research (CBPR) and guided by data and community priorities. This model can be helpful to other marginalized communities in Hawai‘i and the world.
Learning Objectives:
After attending this session, an attendee will be able to:
Discuss various social, emotional, environmental, and health-related barriers to achieving health equity for Native Hawaiians in one homestead community
Identify challenges encountered by caregivers and kūpuna who desire to safely “age in place” within their own communities
Describe one innovative, successful, sustainable community-based public health program created to address the needs of aging kūpuna and their families

Overall Abstract:
“A Journey to Health Equity through Community-Building and Collaboration in the Midst of COVID-19 in One Native Hawaiian Homestead Community”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Due to the consequences of colonization, Native Hawaiians are disproportionately impacted by chronic diseases. Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalawahine are neighboring homesteads, jointly referred to as Papakōlea, and these homestead lands are located in lower socioeconomic areas traditionally associated with poor health outcomes. Kula no na Po'e Hawai'i (KULA) is a 501(c)3 community-based non-profit organization established in 1992 to provide families of the Papakōlea Hawaiian Homestead region with access to culturally relevant services and programs from a social determinant of health perspective.
Methods: KULA’s social determinants of health approach recognizes the cultural, educational, and environmental conditions that impact overall well-being while seeking health equity. KULA’s community and research initiatives are grounded in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach.
Results: Community-based research efforts have led to the successful creation and implementation of social development programs in Papakōlea, such as the Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN). Due to the existence of a robust community infrastructure established through CBPR efforts, Papakōlea has been able to respond quickly and methodically to the needs of its community. Through ongoing community-engaged efforts such as food distribution and vaccination drives, the families of Papakōlea have remained safe, healthy, well-nourished, and at the forefront of a strong and resilient community.
Conclusions and Implications: The following presentations highlight studies that helped Papakōlea successfully pursue its long-term community goal of empowering families to achieve health equity. The model implemented is one that was grounded in CBPR, guided by data and community priorities, and helped address the needs of families and their kūpuna (elders).

Abstract #1: Building community resilience through infrastructure and data:
“Kawaihonaakealoha Kūpuna Service Project”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Papakōlea is a densely populated community with a significant aging population. Kawaihonaakealoha was a community-based research effort to identify the health and safety needs of the community’s kūpuna and implement a community support system that would empower residents to safely ‘age in place.’
 
Methods: Qualified residents completed a 2-part survey over 6 months which included a community-designed Home Environmental Scan and a community-tailored version of the Elder Survey.
Results: 240 surveys (33%) were completed. The top five chronic diseases were: high blood pressure (58%), arthritis (31%), diabetes (26%), cataracts (17%), and asthma (15%). Other needs included: addressing home safety and repairs; functional limitations; instrumental activities of daily living; dietary concerns; long-term care; and housing.
Conclusions: A community-led intervention was implemented which included: (1) coordinating direct assistance to elders; (2) development of a culturally-sensitive, community lead case-management system; and (3) the creation of a service-learning program for Public Health and Social Work practicum students.

Abstract #2: Creating a Community Response to Health Equity through CBPR:
“Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN)”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand the social, environmental, and health-related needs impacting families in Papakōlea.
Methods: The Hawaiian Homestead Health Survey (HHS) was mailed to 390 of 422 homes in Papakōlea. Categories included: social demographics, physical activity, dietary behaviors, mental health, cultural and ethnic identity, and health related factors.
Results: The top five chronic diseases were hypertension (54%), high cholesterol (41%), asthma (26%), diabetes (23%) and arthritis (17%). Respondents had an average BMI of 31, indicating 29% were overweight and 51% were obese. Most have lived in the homestead for 10 or more years (94%), and there is a large population of retirees (37%) and widows (11%).
Conclusions: Using these data, the Kūpuna Community Care Network (KCCN) was developed. It provides kūpuna and their caregivers with educational resources, cultural programming, and training, making health and wellness a priority, and creating demonstrable improvements in health, functional status, and quality of life.

Abstract #3: Providing Community Recovery to the COVID-19 Pandemic through CBPR:
“Kūpuna Community Care Network 2 (KCCN2)”
Abstract:
 
Background and Purpose: Data was collected to inform community-based programs that address health equity through empowering kūpuna of Papakōlea to safely “age in place”.
Methods: Three surveys were conducted: (1) Identifying Our Needs: A Survey of Elders VII; (2) Home Environmental Scan; and (3) Papakōlea Caregiver Survey.
Results: 30% of residents are kūpuna, 93% live in intergenerational homes (37% with 6+ people), and 17% live below the poverty line. A third (33%) provide care for grandchildren, more than a third are caregivers of a kūpuna themselves, and 75% foresee needing a caregiver in the future. The condition of homes and environmental challenges interfere with ‘aging in place’ safely.
Conclusions: The goals of the Kūpuna Community Care Network 2 (KCCN 2) are: 1) to increase the use of technology to address social isolation during the pandemic, 2) provide education and training with a specific focus on pandemic response and dementia, and 3) increase home and community safety

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Adrienne Dillard, PhD

Adrienne Dillard, PhD

Executive Director, Kula No Nā Po‘e Hawai‘i
Dr. Adrienne Dillard is the Executive Director of Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi (KULA), a community-based 501c non-profit formed in 1992 with a specific focus on providing culturally-grounded programs and services in the Hawaiian Homestead communities of Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalāwahine... Read More →
avatar for B. Puni Kekauoha

B. Puni Kekauoha

Associate Director, Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi
Ms. B. Puni Kekauoha is the Associate Director of Kula no na Po‘e Hawaiʻi (KULA), a community-based 501c non-profit formed in 1992 with a specific focus on providing culturally-grounded programs and services in the Hawaiian Homestead communities of Papakōlea, Kewalo, and Kalāwahine... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Andrea Hermosura, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Native Hawaiian Health, JABSOM
Dr. Andrea Hermosura is a Native Hawaiian Assistant Professor at the Department of Native Hawaiian Health and a licensed clinical psychologist at the Queen’s Medical Center and the Physician Center Mililani.
avatar for Sarah Momilani Marshall, PhD

Sarah Momilani Marshall, PhD

Native Hawaiian Postdoctoral Researcher, Hawai'i Pacific University
Dr. Sarah Momilani Marshall is a Native Hawaiian postdoctoral researcher at Hawai‘i Pacific University, focusing on health disparities that persist among rural Hawaiian populations. She is the principal investigator on a National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) diversity supplement... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 4
  Symposium

2:45pm HST

Intersecting Identities: Exploring Privilege and Marginalization in Clinical Practice
This presentation aims to explore how socially constructed identity across different domains (e.g., age, race, ethnicity, social class, sexual orientation, gender identity, ability/disability, religion, etc.) manifest as power and privilege differentials that impact not only the lived experiences and mental health of individuals but can also impact clinical work in harmful ways. We will explore the ADDRESSING Framework, discuss examples of the unique and contextual intersectionality of identities, and how power, privilege, and marginalization can manifest within the client/therapist relationship. We will explore ways of developing more awareness of unconscious biases and privilege/power that therapists may possess and discuss ways of using that developing awareness to reduce the chances of unintentional engagement in microaggressions and other forms of discrimination in clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:
- To introduce the ADDRESSING framework as a model for understanding cultural identities and their relationship to often unconscious dynamics of power and marginalization
- To explore the concept of “intersectionality” as it relates to power/privilege and marginalization in clinical practice
- To reflect on how power/privilege and intersectionality affect our interactions with clients and colleagues
- Understand the differences between “stereotyping” and “generalizing”

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Lucas Morgan, PhD

Lucas Morgan, PhD

I Ola Lahui Behavioral Health
Dr. Morgan is from Hawai'i originally and went away to UMass Boston for his PhD in Clinical Psychology, where he studied mindfulness-based behavioral therapies for anxiety, as well as the impacts of social disadvantage on mental health. He returned home and completed his internship... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 1
  Workshop

2:45pm HST

The Spoken Word: Imbuing Poetry into Therapy, Practice & Life
Poetry Therapy, which is the therapeutic use of poems, narratives, and other spoken or written works to promote well-being and healing, has long served clinicians and clients alike across a multitude of settings. Most recently, we have seen how this therapeutic modality has become utilized as a means of therapeutic expression, connection, and engagement for a diverse span of populations, from correctional facilities to community mental health centers and nonclinical contexts as well.
In this workshop, we will (1) familiarize ourselves with the foundational principles of Poetry Therapy; (2) honor the cultural context of poetry and narrative in Hawai’i, (3) explore the what, when, why and how to use poetry in a therapeutic manner; (4) review recent emerging research related to integrating Spoken Word elements, and (5) engage in a few experiential exercises to integrate Poetry Therapy into our individual practices.
No poetry experience? No problem. Just as the majority of folks who are initially introduced to poetry therapy, no experience is necessary to reap the benefits of this therapeutic modality. In fact, the less experience, the better. So please bring along a notebook, a writing instrument, a healthy bit of inquisitiveness, and a willingness to write something new into your practice, and potentially, your life.

Workshop Learning Objectives:
By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Identify the foundational principles of Poetry Therapy.
  • Discern when and how they may utilize poetry in a therapeutic manner.
  • Discuss the psychological factors involved in Spoken Word Poetry Therapy.
  • Integrate at least two Poetry Therapy exercises into their own practice.

The evaluation/CE request form for this program can be found HERE.

Speakers
avatar for Elnur Gajiev, PsyD

Elnur Gajiev, PsyD

Dr. Elnur Gajiev is a clinical psychologist, poet, and educator. He specializes in bringing together empirically-based, creative therapies to foster greater connection, purpose, and growth for individuals, groups, and organizations. Dr. El is a key pioneer in Spoken Word Poetry Therapy... Read More →


Friday October 22, 2021 2:45pm - 4:15pm HST
Room 5
  Workshop

4:15pm HST

Wrap-up Session
Friday October 22, 2021 4:15pm - 5:00pm HST
Room 1
 
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